General Information
Symbol
Dmel\mys
Species
D. melanogaster
Name
myospheroid
Annotation Symbol
CG1560
Feature Type
FlyBase ID
FBgn0004657
Gene Model Status
Stock Availability
Gene Snapshot
Myospheroid (Mys) is a β subunit of the integrin dimer. Integrin transmembrane receptors function as a link for the extracellular matrix and the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. Mys acts as adhesion/signaling protein regulating cellular adhesion, migration and survival. [Date last reviewed: 2016-06-30]
Also Known As
βPS, βPS, l(1)mys, olfC, βPS-integrin
Genomic Location
Cytogenetic map
Sequence location
X:8,061,645..8,070,237 [+]
Recombination map
1-22
Sequence
Other Genome Views
The following external sites may use different assemblies or annotations than FlyBase.
GO Summary Ribbons
Families, Domains and Molecular Function
Gene Group Membership (FlyBase)
Protein Family (UniProt, Sequence Similarities)
Belongs to the integrin beta chain family. (P11584)
Molecular Function (see GO section for details)
Summaries
Gene Group Membership
INTEGRINS -
Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors composed of an α and β subunit that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. As well as maintaining tissue integrity, they are involved in morphogenesis and development. (Adapted from FBrf0167428).
UniProt Contributed Function Data
Integrin alpha-PS1/beta-PS is a receptor for laminin (PubMed:7972082). Integrin alpha-PS2/beta-PS is a receptor for Tig, wb and Ten-m (PubMed:7924982, PubMed:7972082, PubMed:9660786). Contributes to endodermal integrity and adhesion between the midgut epithelium and the surrounding visceral muscle (PubMed:15469969). Essential for migration of the primordial midgut cells and for maintaining, but not establishing, cell polarity in the midgut epithelium (PubMed:15469969). The two beta subunits mediate midgut migration by distinct mechanisms: beta-PS requires rhea/talin and Itgbn does not (PubMed:15469969). Required for rhea/talin correct cellular localization in the midgut (PubMed:15469969). Required for many embryonic (dorsal closure and somatic muscle attachments) and postembryonic developmental processes (attachment between cell layers of imaginal disks, organization of ommatidial arrays and flight muscle development) (PubMed:8119134, PubMed:7924982, PubMed:7972082, PubMed:10821184). Involved in the function and/or development of the olfactory system (PubMed:10821184). In the testes, essential for shv-dependent maintenance of somatic hub cells and their localization to the apical tip (PubMed:27191715). Plays a role in timely border cell migration during oogenesis (PubMed:19035354).
(UniProt, P11584)
Phenotypic Description from the Red Book (Lindsley and Zimm 1992)
mys: myospheroid
Structural gene for the β subunit of position-specific integrins 1 and 2, PS1 and PS2. Twenty-hour embryos (25) show middorsal herniation of brain and midgut, or both; abnormal somatic, visceral, and pharyngeal muscles; and incomplete morphogenesis of yolk-filled midgut. Development of embryo normal up to 13 hr, even in embryos produced from homozygous germ-line clones (Wieschaus and Noell, 1986, Wilhelm Roux's Arch. Dev. Biol. 195: 63-73). Between 13 and 14.5 hr the first muscular contractions occur, while basement membrane is incomplete. This results in dorsal rupture of hypoderm and retraction of myogenic elements of somatic and pharyngeal muscles into spheroidal masses. Continuation of myogenesis produces spheroidal muscles with a cortex of disoriented fibrillae surrounded by a medulla of nucleated sarcoplasm. Homozygous clones of mys11 on either surface of the wing lead to separation of the two surfaces of the membrane and the formation of blisters in the vicinity of the clone [Brower and Jaffe, 1989, Nature (London) 342: 285-87]. Western blots with antibodies specific to the β subunit of Drosophila PS integrins detects no β integrin in mys10, mys11, and Df(1)C128; in addition, PS1α is not cleaved properly in these genotypes, nor do α chains become localized in mutant embryos. PSβ expression in wild type is diffuse in early embryos, becoming localized between the mesodermal and ectodermal layers at the extended-germ-band stage; also seen at interfaces between epidermal cells and deep in the intersegmental grooves where intersegmental muscles attach. In late embryos antibody staining is seen at basal surface of entire gut epithelium and is also concentrated at muscle attachment sites.
olfC: olfactory-C (J.C. Hall)
Adults show poor responses to acetates and acetone, and have dimished responses to some alcohols, in tests involving Y-tube olfactometer (Rodrigues, 1980). Odor-induced jump assays on olfCx3 and olfCx17 adults (Ayyub et al., 1990) gave results paralleling those using olfactometer (whereby these mutants are in one of two different "acetate defective" categories; see alleles). Larvae respond abnormally to acetetes and normally to aldehydes (Rodrigues, 1980). Electroantennograms (EAGs) recorded from adults show olfC to exhibit diminished responses of olfactory receptors to acetates (Venard and Pichon, 1984) and to 2-butanone as well (Venard et al., 1989). Similar physiological [Siddiqi, 1984, Genetics: New Frontiers (Chopra, Sharma, Joshi, and Bansal, eds.). Oxford and IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi, Vol. III, pp. 243-61], and also behavioral (Rodrigues, 1980), experiments involving pairs of odorants, e.g. ethyl and iso-amyl acetate, suggested more than one independent "channel" for the reception of these substances. In SEM observations (Venard et al., 1989) mutant antenna seems to have normal number and distribution of the three kinds of sensilla on the anterior face of the funiculus (from where EAGs recorded). Electrophoresis of triton extracts of antennae generates an extra band of esterase activity in olfC, which is found in neither wild-type nor in mutant thoraces and abdomens (Venard et al., 1989). olfC males fail to have their courtship of wild-type males inhibited by high concentrations of volatile compounds (unlike normal males, which are inhibited). Mutant males court other males with abnormally high vigor yet court females with subnormal intensity (Tompkins et al., 1981). Further studies showed that the mutant courts immature males vigorously (as do wild-type males), and this wanes as the courtee ages, but not to the same extent as in normal pairings; the inappropriately high levels of olfC courtships directed at maturing males includes all sex behaviors except attempted copulation (Curcillo and Tompkins, 1987). An inability of mutant males to discriminate between recently mated and virgin females was reported by Mane et al. (1983), who also showed that olfC males can detect, 6 hours post insemination, a difference between females mated to Est-60 males vs. males carrying a non-null allele of this gene (the latter kind of mated females were said to be relatively inhibitory to male courtship); these experiments suggested that the enzyme encoded by Est-6 turns a "pre-anti-aphrodisiac" compound, cis-vaccenyl acetate, which is transferred from males to females during copulation into a further, or the actual aphrodisiac, cis-vaccenyl alcohol; some elements of such results and inferences (Mane et al., 1983) have been called into question (Vander Meer, Obin, Zawistowski, Sheehan, and Richmond, 1986, J. Insect Physiol. 32: 681-86; Scott and Richmond, 1987, J. Insect Physiol. 33: 363-69) but argued by others [Ferveur, Cobb, and Jallon, 1989, Neurobiology of Sensory Systems (Singh and Strausfeld, eds.). Plenum Press, New York, pp. 377-85, pp. 397-409] to still have force, at least insofar as an anti-aphrodisiac role for cis-vaccenyl acetate goes.
Gene Model and Products
Number of Transcripts
4
Number of Unique Polypeptides
2

Please see the GBrowse view of Dmel\mys or the JBrowse view of Dmel\mys for information on other features

To submit a correction to a gene model please use the Contact FlyBase form

Protein Domains (via Pfam)
Isoform displayed:
Pfam protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Protein Domains (via SMART)
Isoform displayed:
SMART protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Comments on Gene Model
Annotated transcripts do not represent all possible combinations of alternative exons and/or alternative promoters.
Annotated transcripts do not represent all supported alternative splices within 5' UTR.
Low-frequency RNA-Seq exon junction(s) not annotated.
Gene model reviewed during 5.50
Sequence Ontology: Class of Gene
Transcript Data
Annotated Transcripts
Name
FlyBase ID
RefSeq ID
Length (nt)
Assoc. CDS (aa)
FBtr0071105
4042
846
FBtr0340135
4042
846
FBtr0340136
4187
846
FBtr0340137
4397
846
Additional Transcript Data and Comments
Reported size (kB)
Comments
External Data
Crossreferences
Polypeptide Data
Annotated Polypeptides
Name
FlyBase ID
Predicted MW (kDa)
Length (aa)
Theoretical pI
RefSeq ID
GenBank
FBpp0071061
92.7
846
5.84
FBpp0309121
92.6
846
5.84
FBpp0309122
92.7
846
5.84
FBpp0309123
92.7
846
5.84
Polypeptides with Identical Sequences

The group(s) of polypeptides indicated below share identical sequence to each other.

846 aa isoforms: mys-PA, mys-PC, mys-PD
Additional Polypeptide Data and Comments
Reported size (kDa)
846 (aa); 90 (kD predicted)
Comments
External Data
Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)
Heterodimer of an alpha and a beta subunit. Beta-PS associates with either alpha-PS1, alpha-PS2, alpha-PS3, alpha-PS4 or alpha-PS5.
(UniProt, P11584)
Linkouts
Sequences Consistent with the Gene Model
Nucleotide / Polypeptide Records
 
Mapped Features

Click to get a list of regulatory features (enhancers, TFBS, etc.) and gene disruptions (point mutations, indels, etc.) within or overlapping Dmel\mys using the Feature Mapper tool.

External Data
Crossreferences
Linkouts
Gene Ontology (54 terms)
Molecular Function (4 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (3 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:Tig; FB:FBgn0011722
inferred from physical interaction with UniProtKB:Q9VPQ2
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:rhea; FB:FBgn0260442
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:scb; FB:FBgn0286785
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:if; FB:FBgn0001250
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:mew; FB:FBgn0004456
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
Biological Process (37 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (30 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:Rap1; FB:FBgn0004636
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:PDZ-GEF; FB:FBgn0265778
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (11 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from sequence or structural similarity
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
traceable author statement
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
traceable author statement
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
traceable author statement
traceable author statement
Cellular Component (13 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (12 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:scb; FB:FBgn0286785
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from high throughput direct assay
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (3 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
inferred from sequence or structural similarity
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
non-traceable author statement
inferred from biological aspect of ancestor with PANTHER:PTN000801545
(assigned by GO_Central )
inferred from sequence or structural similarity
Expression Data
Transcript Expression
Polypeptide Expression
No Assay Recorded
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
immunolocalization
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
wing cell

Comment: basal surface

mass spectroscopy
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Additional Descriptive Data
mys staining is observed along lateral, apical, and basal follicle cell membranes through stage 10A. Apical staining peaks in stage 9 and 10A columnal follicle cells overlying the oocyte while downregulating in the most posterior follicle cells. Expression is also seen in border cells at intercellular junctions. After stage 10A, the remaining follicle cell populations begin down-regulating apically localized mys while maintaining lateral and basal localization during dorsal appendage morphogenesis.
mys protein is localized to both germline and somatic cells in the germarium, but is restricted to follicle cells later in oogenesis. It is concentrated to the basolateral side of cells, but also has some apical localization.
The mys protein is enriched at the muscle-tendon junction in third instar larvae and is found in both the tendon cell and the muscle cell. The expression pattern partially overlaps that of the shot protein.
Protein is detected in the muscle attachment sites underneath the hypoderm in stage 15-16 embryos.
Only a faint residual band of mys protein is seen on immunoblots of @MysXG43 mutant embryos. This is thought to be a remnant from the maternal supply. No staining is seen at muscle attachment sites.
Nearly wild type levels of mys protein are seen on immunoblots.
Nearly wild type levels of mys protein are seen on immunoblots. mysXN101 protein is observed at muscle attachment sites but at reduced levels.
Only a faint residual band of mys protein is seen on immunoblots of mys1 mutant embryos. This is thought to be a remnant from the maternal supply. No staining is seen at muscle attachment sites.
the greatest concentration of mys protein is found at somatic muscle attachment sites. Staining is also observed in the pharynx, midgut, and hindgut.
Only a faint residual band of protein is seen on immunoblots of mysXB87 mutant embryos. This is thought to be a remnant from the maternal supply. No staining is seen at muscle attachment sites.
Marker for
 
Subcellular Localization
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
inferred from physical interaction with FLYBASE:scb; FB:FBgn0286785
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from direct assay
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from high throughput direct assay
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
Expression Deduced from Reporters
High-Throughput Expression Data
Associated Tools

GBrowse - Visual display of RNA-Seq signals

View Dmel\mys in GBrowse 2
RNA-Seq by Region - Search RNA-Seq expression levels by exon or genomic region
Reference
See Gelbart and Emmert, 2013 for analysis details and data files for all genes.
Developmental Proteome: Life Cycle
Developmental Proteome: Embryogenesis
External Data and Images
Linkouts
BDGP expression data - Patterns of gene expression in Drosophila embryogenesis
FLIGHT - Cell culture data for RNAi and other high-throughput technologies
FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
Images
FlyExpress - Embryonic expression images (BDGP data)
  • Stages(s) 1-3
  • Stages(s) 7-8
  • Stages(s) 9-10
  • Stages(s) 11-12
  • Stages(s) 13-16
Alleles, Insertions, Transgenic Constructs and Phenotypes
Classical and Insertion Alleles ( 114 )
For All Classical and Insertion Alleles Show
 
Allele of mys
Class
Mutagen
Associated Insertion
Stocks
Known lesion
    0
    --
    Other relevant insertions
    Transgenic Constructs ( 45 )
    For All Alleles Carried on Transgenic Constructs Show
    Transgenic constructs containing/affecting coding region of mys
    Allele of mys
    Mutagen
    Associated Transgenic Construct
    Stocks
    Transgenic constructs containing regulatory region of mys
    Deletions and Duplications ( 13 )
    Summary of Phenotypes
    For more details about a specific phenotype click on the relevant allele symbol.
    Lethality
    Allele
    Sterility
    Allele
    Other Phenotypes
    Allele
    Phenotype manifest in
    Allele
    actin filament & follicle cell | somatic clone
    bouton & neuromuscular junction
    bouton & neuromuscular junction, with Scer\GAL4elav-C155
    bouton & neuromuscular junction, with Scer\GAL4F11
    bouton & neuromuscular junction, with Scer\GAL4α
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal lateral longitudinal muscle 1
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4F11
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4α
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1 | conditional ts
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3, with Scer\GAL4F11
    bouton & neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3, with Scer\GAL4α
    bouton & neuromuscular junction | conditional ts
    embryonic/larval visceral muscle & midgut
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal lateral longitudinal muscle 1
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal lateral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4F11
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal lateral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4α
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4F11
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1, with Scer\GAL4α
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 1 | conditional ts
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3, with Scer\GAL4F11
    neuromuscular junction & abdominal ventral longitudinal muscle 3, with Scer\GAL4α
    Orthologs
    Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1)
    Homo sapiens (Human) (9)
    Species\Gene Symbol
    Score
    Best Score
    Best Reverse Score
    Alignment
    Complementation?
    Transgene?
    13 of 15
    Yes
    Yes
    9 of 15
    No
    Yes
     
    9 of 15
    No
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    6 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    4 of 15
    No
    Yes
    2 of 15
    No
    No
    Model Organism Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1)
    Mus musculus (laboratory mouse) (10)
    Species\Gene Symbol
    Score
    Best Score
    Best Reverse Score
    Alignment
    Complementation?
    Transgene?
    13 of 15
    Yes
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    7 of 15
    No
    Yes
    6 of 15
    No
    Yes
    6 of 15
    No
    Yes
    6 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    4 of 15
    No
    Yes
    2 of 15
    No
    No
    Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat) (8)
    11 of 13
    Yes
    Yes
    8 of 13
    No
    Yes
    7 of 13
    No
    Yes
    6 of 13
    No
    Yes
    4 of 13
    No
    Yes
    4 of 13
    No
    Yes
    2 of 13
    No
    No
    1 of 13
    No
    No
    Xenopus tropicalis (Western clawed frog) (8)
    10 of 12
    Yes
    Yes
    4 of 12
    No
    Yes
    3 of 12
    No
    Yes
    3 of 12
    No
    Yes
    3 of 12
    No
    Yes
    2 of 12
    No
    Yes
    2 of 12
    No
    Yes
    1 of 12
    No
    No
    Danio rerio (Zebrafish) (14)
    12 of 15
    Yes
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    8 of 15
    No
    Yes
    7 of 15
    No
    Yes
    6 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    5 of 15
    No
    Yes
    4 of 15
    No
    Yes
    3 of 15
    No
    Yes
    3 of 15
    No
    Yes
    2 of 15
    No
    Yes
    1 of 15
    No
    No
    Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode, roundworm) (2)
    14 of 15
    Yes
    Yes
    3 of 15
    No
    Yes
    Arabidopsis thaliana (thale-cress) (0)
    No orthologs reported.
    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) (0)
    No orthologs reported.
    Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Fission yeast) (0)
    No orthologs reported.
    Orthologs in Drosophila Species (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091902WF )
    Organism
    Common Name
    Gene
    AAA Syntenic Ortholog
    Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
    Drosophila melanogaster
    fruit fly
    Drosophila suzukii
    Spotted wing Drosophila
    Drosophila simulans
    Drosophila sechellia
    Drosophila erecta
    Drosophila yakuba
    Drosophila ananassae
    Drosophila pseudoobscura pseudoobscura
    Drosophila persimilis
    Drosophila willistoni
    Drosophila virilis
    Drosophila mojavensis
    Drosophila grimshawi
    Orthologs in non-Drosophila Dipterans (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091501FT )
    Organism
    Common Name
    Gene
    Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
    Musca domestica
    House fly
    Glossina morsitans
    Tsetse fly
    Lucilia cuprina
    Australian sheep blowfly
    Mayetiola destructor
    Hessian fly
    Aedes aegypti
    Yellow fever mosquito
    Anopheles darlingi
    American malaria mosquito
    Anopheles gambiae
    Malaria mosquito
    Culex quinquefasciatus
    Southern house mosquito
    Culex quinquefasciatus
    Southern house mosquito
    Orthologs in non-Dipteran Insects (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090W026T )
    Organism
    Common Name
    Gene
    Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
    Bombyx mori
    Silkmoth
    Danaus plexippus
    Monarch butterfly
    Heliconius melpomene
    Postman butterfly
    Apis florea
    Little honeybee
    Apis mellifera
    Western honey bee
    Bombus impatiens
    Common eastern bumble bee
    Bombus terrestris
    Buff-tailed bumblebee
    Linepithema humile
    Argentine ant
    Megachile rotundata
    Alfalfa leafcutting bee
    Nasonia vitripennis
    Parasitic wasp
    Nasonia vitripennis
    Parasitic wasp
    Dendroctonus ponderosae
    Mountain pine beetle
    Tribolium castaneum
    Red flour beetle
    Pediculus humanus
    Human body louse
    Rhodnius prolixus
    Kissing bug
    Cimex lectularius
    Bed bug
    Acyrthosiphon pisum
    Pea aphid
    Acyrthosiphon pisum
    Pea aphid
    Zootermopsis nevadensis
    Nevada dampwood termite
    Orthologs in non-Insect Arthropods (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090X0243 )
    Organism
    Common Name
    Gene
    Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
    Strigamia maritima
    European centipede
    Strigamia maritima
    European centipede
    Strigamia maritima
    European centipede
    Ixodes scapularis
    Black-legged tick
    Ixodes scapularis
    Black-legged tick
    Ixodes scapularis
    Black-legged tick
    Stegodyphus mimosarum
    African social velvet spider
    Tetranychus urticae
    Two-spotted spider mite
    Daphnia pulex
    Water flea
    Orthologs in non-Arthropod Metazoa (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091G029W )
    Organism
    Common Name
    Gene
    Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Purple sea urchin
    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Purple sea urchin
    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Purple sea urchin
    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Purple sea urchin
    Ciona intestinalis
    Vase tunicate
    Ciona intestinalis
    Vase tunicate
    Ciona intestinalis
    Vase tunicate
    Ciona intestinalis
    Vase tunicate
    Ciona intestinalis
    Vase tunicate
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Gallus gallus
    Domestic chicken
    Human Disease Model Data
    FlyBase Human Disease Model Reports
      Alleles Reported to Model Human Disease (Disease Ontology)
      Download
      Models ( 0 )
      Allele
      Disease
      Evidence
      References
      Interactions ( 0 )
      Allele
      Disease
      Interaction
      References
      Comments ( 0 )
       
      Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1)
      Note that ortholog calls supported by only 1 or 2 algorithms (DIOPT score < 3) are not shown.
      Functional Complementation Data
      Functional complementation data is computed by FlyBase using a combination of the orthology data obtained from DIOPT and OrthoDB and the allele-level genetic interaction data curated from the literature.
      Interactions
      Summary of Physical Interactions
      esyN Network Diagram
      Show neighbor-neighbor interactions:
      Select Layout:
      Legend:
      Protein
      RNA
      Selected Interactor(s)
      Interactions Browser

      Please look at the Interaction Group reports for full details of the physical interactions
      protein-protein
      Interacting group
      Assay
      References
      Summary of Genetic Interactions
      esyN Network Diagram
      esyN Network Key:
      Suppression
      Enhancement

      Please look at the allele data for full details of the genetic interactions
      Starting gene(s)
      Interaction type
      Interacting gene(s)
      Reference
      Starting gene(s)
      Interaction type
      Interacting gene(s)
      Reference
      External Data
      Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)
      Heterodimer of an alpha and a beta subunit. Beta-PS associates with either alpha-PS1, alpha-PS2, alpha-PS3, alpha-PS4 or alpha-PS5.
      (UniProt, P11584 )
      Linkouts
      BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
      DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
      InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
      Pathways
      Genomic Location and Detailed Mapping Data
      Chromosome (arm)
      X
      Recombination map
      1-22
      Cytogenetic map
      Sequence location
      X:8,061,645..8,070,237 [+]
      FlyBase Computed Cytological Location
      Cytogenetic map
      Evidence for location
      7D5-7D5
      Limits computationally determined from genome sequence between P{EP}snEP1217 and P{EP}Ubc-E2HEP1303
      Experimentally Determined Cytological Location
      Cytogenetic map
      Notes
      References
      7D3-7D7
      (determined by in situ hybridisation) 7D3--5 (determined by in situ hybridisation) 7D1--9 (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      7D3-7D7
      (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      7D3-7D5
      (determined by in situ hybridisation) 7D5--9 (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      7D3-7D5
      (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      7C8-7C9
      (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      7D5-7D6
      (determined by in situ hybridisation)
      Experimentally Determined Recombination Data
      Left of (cM)
      Notes
      "l(1)968" has been mapped to the region containing mys.
      Closely linked to sn. Based on mapping of mysolfC-x3.
      Maps closer to sn than to cv.
      Stocks and Reagents
      Stocks (22)
      Genomic Clones (18)
      cDNA Clones (168)
       

      Please Note This section lists cDNAs and ESTs that fall within the genomic extent of the gene model, which may include cDNAs and ESTs of genes within introns, or of overlapping genes. Please see GBrowse for alignment of the cDNAs and ESTs to the gene model.

      cDNA clones, fully sequences
      BDGP DGC clones
      Other clones
      Drosophila Genomics Resource Center cDNA clones

      For each fully sequenced cDNA the DGRC maintains various forms of the cDNA (e.g tagged or untagged) in several different host vectors for subsequent cloning and expression in Drosophila and Drosophila cell lines.

      cDNA Clones, End Sequenced (ESTs)
      RNAi and Array Information
      Linkouts
      DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
      GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
      Antibody Information
      Laboratory Generated Antibodies
       
      Commercially Available Antibodies
       
      Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank - Monoclonal antibodies for use in research
      Other Information
      Relationship to Other Genes
      Source for database identify of
      Source for database merge of
      Source for merge of: mys CG1560
      Source for merge of: mys olfC
      Source for merge of: mys l(1)G0281 l(1)G0233
      Additional comments
      "l(1)968" may correspond to "mys".
      Originally isolated (Rodrigues and Siddiqi, 1978) in the same 'then-unnamed' manner as olfA, olfB and olfD (the latter = sbl).
      Other Comments
      Mutations at residue 409 increase ligand binding.
      mys is required for maintenance of tracheal terminal branches and luminal organization.
      Strong mys alleles fail to complement antimorphic mys alleles at all temperatures. Weak mys alleles are able to complement antimorphic mys alleles at low temperatures. The lethality of mys hemizygotes is increased when mutants are also mew or if heterozygotes.
      dsRNA made from templates generated with primers directed against this gene tested in RNAi screen for effects on Kc167 and S2R+ cell morphology.
      RNAi screen using dsRNA made from templates generated with primers directed against this gene causes a phenotype when assayed in S2R+ cells: cells become round and detached. Kc167 cells are unaffected.
      mys together with if functions in the olfactory pathway.
      mys at the postembryonic neuromuscular junction is a critical determinant of morphological growth and synapse specificity.
      Homologous genetic loci in D.subobscura and D.melanogaster tend to show a similar ultrastructure in the two species.
      Identification: Directed mosaic screen for lethally mutable loci having an effect in the follicular epithelium.
      The functional significance of the cytoplasmic domains of the if, mew and mys subunits of the Position Specific (PS) integrin family are studied by analysing the relationship between the cytoplasmic domain structure and function in the context of a developing organism. Although many events require the mys cytoplasmic domain, this portion of the molecule is not required for at least two processes requiring PS integrins: formation of midgut constrictions and maintaining germband integrity. Mutation of residues in the cytoplasmic tail function suggest that interaction of the PS integrins with cytoplasmic ligands is developmentally modulated during embryogenesis.
      if and mys can be localised by an intracellular mechanism within the muscles. Direct localisation of the transmembrane protein to sites of integrin function occurs in cells that lack endogenous mys and if or cells that lack extracellular signals from the tendon cells.
      The retinal phenotypes of integrin mutants trace their origin to the structural failure of the cone cell plate and the focal adhesions of the pigment cells.
      mys transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain contains sufficient information to target the integrins to the muscle attachment sites.
      hh, wg and mys are required for epithelial morphogenesis during proventriculus organ development. The morphogenetic process is suppressed by dpp. These results identify a novel cell signalling centre in the foregut that operates through a distinct genetic circuitry in the midgut to direct the formation of a multiply folded organ from a simple epithelial tube.
      Phenotypic analysis of mew, if and mys embryos suggests multiple roles for PS integrins in the adhesion of cells and in the formation, organization and migration of embryonic tissues. Although the proteins are often expressed in adjacent embryonic tissues, this distribution does not necessarily reflect equivalent requirements. The complete loss of both α subunits, encoded by mew and if, does not produce all the phenotypes observed in embryos lacking the mys encoded β subunit.
      Mutant alleles can affect axonal pathfinding and glial cell migration in the developing optic lobe.
      Comparison of the null phenotypes of mys (encoding the ΒPS integrin subunit) and if rules out a model where PS integrin function occurs solely by the direct interaction of the two PS integrins, αPS1ΒPS and αPS2ΒPS.
      Analysis of a series of mys mutants reveals that the efficiency with which the mutant proteins function in different morphogenetic processes varies greatly, suggesting that the cytoplasmic interactions involving PS integrins are developmentally modulated.
      Muscle phenotype of mutants studied using polarised light microscopy and antibody staining to detect Mhc-lacZ reporter gene expression in muscles.
      The distribution of LanA and mys products in wing development suggests that laminin is not a ligand for integrin in this context.
      The PS integrins are required throughout pupation for wing development, but only during late pupation for eye development. They are not required for the differentiation of ommatidial cells, only for their organization. They maintain interactions between the wing epithelia during the two phases of pupal wing expansion and in the attachment of a fully formed fenestrated membrane to the basement membrane of the retina. A requirement for the alternative splicing of the mys transcript during embryogenesis has been demonstrated.
      PS2 integrin is expressed on the surface of cells and can mediate cell spreading on an undefined component of fetal calf serum, on the purified vertebrate matrix molecules vitronectin and fibronectin, and on RGD peptide. Spreading can be inhibited by soluble RGD peptide and is dependent on divalent cations.
      Fas3, mys, disco, zip, l(2)gl, N and Egfr mutants show an additive phenotype in combination with Fas1TE89Da.
      The requirement for integrins during development has been studied using animals mosaic for mys mutations. Expression of mys is required in many parts of the developing fly, with an especially large requirement in ventrally derived tissues.
      mys gene product is the PSβ integrin subunit. mys is required to ensure the correct apposition and patterning of the wing epithelia.
      mys function is required for muscle formation and proper CNS development. Mutants in mys specifically affect the tergal depressor of the trocanter.
      mys cDNA has been cloned and sequenced. mys encodes a putative membrane protein with homology to vertebrate integrin β subunits.
      mys mutants display failure of dorsal closure.
      Mutagenesis of mysolfC-x17 led to some strains with 'stronger' acetate-based olfactory deficit than the starting mutant. In one of these called "olfCx17-1a", responses to iso-amyl acetate worse than in mysolfC-x17 and the new strain also shows reduction in responses to benzaldehyde; both of these abnormalities covered by Dp(1;2)sn+72d and uncovered by Df(1)ct-J4, apparently placing this novel genetic defect in 7A2-C1, a region separate from olfC.
      Structural gene for the β subunit of position-specific integrins 1 and 2, PS1 and PS2. Twenty-hour embryos (25oC) show middorsal herniation of brain and midgut, or both; abnormal somatic, visceral and pharyngeal muscles; and incomplete morphogenesis of yolk-filled midgut. Development of embryo normal up to 13 hr, even in embryos produced from homozygous germ-line clones (Wieschaus and Noell, 1986). Between 13 and 14.5 hr the first muscular contractions occur, while basement membrane is incomplete. This results in dorsal rupture of hypoderm and retraction of myogenic elements of somatic and pharyngeal muscles into spheroidal masses. Continuation of myogenesis produces spheroidal muscles with a cortex of disoriented fibrillae surrounded by a medulla of nucleated sarcoplasm. Homozygous clones of mys11 on either surface of the wing lead to separation of the two surfaces of the membrane and the formation of blisters in the vicinity of the clone (Brower and Jaffe, 1989). Western blots with antibodies specific to the β subunit of Drosophila PS integrins detects no β integrin in mys10, mys11 and Df(1)C128; in addition, PS1α is not cleaved properly in these genotypes, nor do α chains become localized in mutant embryos. PSβ expression in wild type is diffuse in early embryos, becoming localized between the mesodermal and ectodermal layers at the extended-germ-band stage; also seen at interfaces between epidermal cells and deep in the intersegmental grooves where intersegmental muscles attach. In late embryos antibody staining is seen at basal surface of entire gut epithelium and is also concentrated at muscle attachment sites. Information related to olfC alleles: Adults show poor responses to acetates and acetone and have diminished responses to some alcohols, in tests involving Y-tube olfactometer (Rodrigues, 1980). Odor-induced jump assays on mysolfC-x3 and mysolfC-x17 adults (Ayyub et al., 1990) gave results paralleling those using olfactometer (whereby these mutants are in one of two different 'acetate defective' categories; see alleles). Larvae respond abnormally to acetetes and normally to aldehydes (Rodrigues, 1980). Electroantennograms (EAGs) recorded from adults show olfC to exhibit diminished responses of olfactory receptors to acetates (Venard and Pichon, 1984) and to 2-butanone as well (Venard et al., 1989). Similar physiological (Siddiqi, 1984) and also behavioral (Rodrigues, 1980), experiments involving pairs of odorants, e.g. ethyl and iso-amyl acetate, suggested more than one independent 'channel' for the reception of these substances. In SEM observations (Venard et al., 1989) mutant antenna seems to have normal number and distribution of the three kinds of sensilla on the anterior face of the funiculus (from where EAGs recorded). Electrophoresis of triton extracts of antennae generates an extra band of esterase activity in olfC, which is found in neither wild-type nor in mutant thoraces and abdomens (Venard et al., 1989). olfC males fail to have their courtship of wild-type males inhibited by high concentrations of volatile compounds (unlike normal males, which are inhibited). Mutant males court other males with abnormally high vigor yet court females with subnormal intensity (Tompkins et al., 1981). Further studies showed that the mutant courts immature males vigorously (as do wild-type males) and this wanes as the courtee ages, but not to the same extent as in normal pairings; the inappropriately high levels of olfC courtships directed at maturing males includes all sex behaviors except attempted copulation (Curcillo and Tompkins, 1987). An inability of mutant males to discriminate between recently mated and virgin females was reported by Mane et al. (1983), who also showed that olfC males can detect, 6 hours post insemination, a difference between females mated to Est-60 males vs. males carrying a non-null allele of this gene (the latter kind of mated females were said to be relatively inhibitory to male courtship); these experiments suggested that the enzyme encoded by Est-6 turns a 'pre-anti-aphrodisiac' compound, cis-vaccenyl acetate, which is transferred from males to females during copulation into a further, or the actual aphrodisiac, cis-vaccenyl alcohol; some elements of such results and inferences (Mane et al., 1983) have been called into question (van der Meer, Obin, Zawistowski, Sheehan, and Richmond, 1986; Scott and Richmond, 1987) but argued by others (Ferveur, Cobb and Jallon, 1989) to still have force, at least insofar as an anti-aphrodisiac role for cis-vaccenyl acetate goes.
      Origin and Etymology
      Discoverer
      Etymology
      Identification
      External Crossreferences and Linkouts ( 71 )
      Crossreferences
      NCBI Gene - Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes, and links to genome-, phenotype-, and locus-specific resources worldwide.
      GenBank Nucleotide - A collection of sequences from several sources, including GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB.
      GenBank Protein - A collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB.
      RefSeq - A comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of reference sequences including genomic, transcript, and protein.
      UniProt/Swiss-Prot - Manually annotated and reviewed records of protein sequence and functional information
      UniProt/TrEMBL - Automatically annotated and unreviewed records of protein sequence and functional information
      Linkouts
      BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
      Drosophila Genomics Resource Center - Drosophila Genomics Resource Center cDNA clones
      DPiM - Drosophila Protein interaction map
      DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
      DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
      Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank - Monoclonal antibodies for use in research
      FLIGHT - Cell culture data for RNAi and other high-throughput technologies
      FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
      Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
      Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
      FlyMine - An integrated database for Drosophila genomics
      GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
      Interactive Fly - A cyberspace guide to Drosophila development and metazoan evolution
      InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
      KEGG Genes - Molecular building blocks of life in the genomic space.
      modMine - A data warehouse for the modENCODE project
      Synonyms and Secondary IDs (87)
      Reported As
      Symbol Synonym
      PSβ
      integrin βPS
      l(1)7Dn
      l(1)DA551
      l(1)EM28
      mys
      (Richier et al., 2018, Hermle et al., 2017, Nagel et al., 2017, Park et al., 2017, Ashe, 2016, Lee et al., 2016, Ma, 2016, Maartens et al., 2016, Maistrenko et al., 2016, Meltzer et al., 2016, Ng et al., 2016, Peters and Berg, 2016, Sarov et al., 2016, Grotewiel and Bettinger, 2015, Lee et al., 2015, Ojelade et al., 2015, Sawala et al., 2015, Soba et al., 2015, Tiwari et al., 2015, Van Bortle et al., 2015, Wang et al., 2015, Ashwal-Fluss et al., 2014, Gómez-Lamarca et al., 2014, Guo et al., 2014, Kim and Choe, 2014, Kim et al., 2014, Okumura et al., 2014, Weitkunat and Schnorrer, 2014, Xie et al., 2014, You et al., 2014, Bharadwaj et al., 2013, Brown et al., 2013.2.5, Coelho et al., 2013, Comber et al., 2013, Grubbs et al., 2013, Lin et al., 2013, Liu et al., 2013, Moreira et al., 2013, Müller et al., 2013, O'Donnell and Bashaw, 2013, Robinson and Atkinson, 2013, Weavers and Skaer, 2013, Chen et al., 2012, Cho et al., 2012, Chountala et al., 2012, Gates, 2012, Gurudatta et al., 2012, Han et al., 2012, Japanese National Institute of Genetics, 2012.5.21, Kaun et al., 2012, Kim et al., 2012, Kókai et al., 2012, Vanderploeg et al., 2012, Belacortu et al., 2011, Bhuin and Roy, 2011, Egoz-Matia et al., 2011, Ellis et al., 2011, Haigo and Bilder, 2011, Knox et al., 2011, Liu and Geisbrecht, 2011, Mirkovic et al., 2011, Nagaosa et al., 2011, Pastor-Pareja and Xu, 2011, Pilgram et al., 2011, Pines et al., 2011, Ribeiro et al., 2011, Sakaidani et al., 2011, Urbano et al., 2011, Xie and Auld, 2011, Zervas et al., 2011, Bahri et al., 2010, Blanco et al., 2010, Dilks and DiNardo, 2010, Fraichard et al., 2010, Georgiou and Baum, 2010, Gohl et al., 2010, Itoh et al., 2010, Kadandale et al., 2010, McMahon et al., 2010, Negreiros et al., 2010, Perkins et al., 2010, Popodi et al., 2010-, Rui et al., 2010, Stofanko et al., 2010, Tikhmyanova et al., 2010, Venken et al., 2010, Zhang and Ten Hagen, 2010, Zhang et al., 2010, Bhandari et al., 2009, Bischoff et al., 2009, Delon and Brown, 2009, Gorfinkiel et al., 2009, Ida et al., 2009, Rushton et al., 2009, Tan et al., 2009, Alves-Silva et al., 2008, Bai et al., 2008, Chen et al., 2008, Dinkins et al., 2008, Fernandez-Minan et al., 2008, Florence and Faller, 2008, Lee et al., 2008, Loer et al., 2008, Loer et al., 2008, O'Reilly et al., 2008, Tsai et al., 2008, Beltran et al., 2007, Buff et al., 2007, Chanana et al., 2007, Conder et al., 2007, Devenport et al., 2007, Dietzl et al., 2007, Dominguez-Gimenez et al., 2007, Estrada et al., 2007, Fernández-Miñán et al., 2007, Huang et al., 2007, Inoue and Hayashi, 2007, James et al., 2007, Jani and Schock, 2007, Nguyen et al., 2007, Peralta et al., 2007, Subramanian et al., 2007, Szafranski and Goode, 2007, Tanentzapf et al., 2007, Volohonsky et al., 2007, Bhandari et al., 2006, Bolivar et al., 2006, Dionne et al., 2006, Hollien and Weissman, 2006, Hollien and Weissman, 2006, Homsy et al., 2006, Huelsmann et al., 2006, Levi et al., 2006, Mirkovic and Mlodzik, 2006, Tanentzapf and Brown, 2006, Becam et al., 2005, Bokel et al., 2005, Coffman et al., 2005, Liebl and Featherstone, 2005, Ayyub and Paranjape, 2002, Gullberg et al., 1994, Lindsley and Zimm, 1992)
      β-PS-integrin
      βPS
      (Hughes and Jacobs, 2017, Pérez-Moreno et al., 2017, Valdivia et al., 2017, Ashe, 2016, Maartens et al., 2016, Aradhya et al., 2015, Bogatan et al., 2015, Klapholz et al., 2015, Sawala et al., 2015, Tavares et al., 2015, Wang et al., 2015, Pérez-Moreno et al., 2014, Chen and Zhang, 2013, Daley and Yamada, 2013, Johnson et al., 2013, Liu et al., 2013, Momota et al., 2013, Patel and Myat, 2013, Pirraglia et al., 2013, Weavers and Skaer, 2013, Bouaouina et al., 2012, Bulgakova et al., 2012, Chountala et al., 2012, Gates, 2012, Lahaye et al., 2012, Patel et al., 2012, Vakaloglou et al., 2012, Zhai et al., 2012, Bhuin and Roy, 2011, Egoz-Matia et al., 2011, Ellis et al., 2011, Kendall et al., 2011, Meghana et al., 2011, Olguín et al., 2011, Pines et al., 2011, Xie and Auld, 2011, Zervas et al., 2011, Deng et al., 2010, Yuan et al., 2010, Bischoff et al., 2009, Delon and Brown, 2009, Deng et al., 2009, Jattani et al., 2009, Rushton et al., 2009, Urbano et al., 2009, Chen et al., 2008, Dinkins et al., 2008, Loer et al., 2008, Loer et al., 2008, O'Reilly et al., 2008, Schotman et al., 2008, Devenport et al., 2007, Fernández-Miñán et al., 2007, James et al., 2007, Jani and Schock, 2007, Subramanian et al., 2007, Takada et al., 2007, Tanentzapf et al., 2007, Wada et al., 2007, Tanentzapf and Brown, 2006, Tanentzapf et al., 2006, Curtin et al., 2005, Bunch et al., 2004, Devenport and Brown, 2004, Grabbe et al., 2004, Martin-Bermudo et al., 2004, Narasimha and Brown, 2004, Swan et al., 2004, Torgler et al., 2004, Abrams et al., 2003, Brower, 2003, Clark et al., 2003, Bokel and Brown, 2002, Araujo et al., 2001, Clark et al., 2001, Hughes, 2001, Zervas et al., 2001, Brown, 2000, Brown et al., 2000, Hynes and Zhao, 2000, Kim and Chiba, 2000, Martin-Bermudo, 2000, Martin-Bermudo and Brown, 2000, Sone et al., 2000, Beumer et al., 1999, Martin-Bermudo and Brown, 1999, Bunch et al., 1998, Hoang and Chiba, 1998, Martin-Bermudo et al., 1998, Martin-Bermudo et al., 1997, Stark et al., 1997, Zusman et al., 1997, Yarnitzky and Volk, 1995, Gotwals et al., 1994, Gotwals et al., 1994, Brown et al., 1993)
      βPS-Integrin
      Name Synonyms
      Integrin betaPS subunit
      Integrin-βPS
      PS integrin β subunit
      beta PS integrin
      beta-Integrin
      integrin PSβ
      integrin βPS subunit
      integrin βPS
      integrin βPS subunit
      integrin-βPS
      integrinβ
      lethal(1)93 pupal
      myo-spheroid
      myospheroid
      (Aristotelous et al., 2018, Pérez-Moreno et al., 2017, Lee et al., 2016, Maistrenko et al., 2016, Peters and Berg, 2016, Wieschaus and Nüsslein-Volhard, 2016, Maartens and Brown, 2015, Ojelade et al., 2015, Gómez-Lamarca et al., 2014, Kim et al., 2014, Wang et al., 2014, Brown et al., 2013.2.5, Catterson et al., 2013, Johnson et al., 2013, Moreira et al., 2013, O'Donnell and Bashaw, 2013, Weavers and Skaer, 2013, Bossing et al., 2012, Gates, 2012, Han et al., 2012, Kaun et al., 2012, Cammarato et al., 2011, Egoz-Matia et al., 2011, Haigo and Bilder, 2011, Jones and Grotewiel, 2011, Pastor-Pareja and Xu, 2011, Urbano et al., 2011, Bahri et al., 2010, Dilks and DiNardo, 2010, Fraichard et al., 2010, Gohl et al., 2010, Kadandale et al., 2010, Bischoff et al., 2009, Gorfinkiel et al., 2009, Layton et al., 2009, Rodahl et al., 2009, Viktorinová et al., 2009, Alves-Silva et al., 2008, Bai et al., 2008, Chen et al., 2008, Fernandez-Minan et al., 2008, Florence and Faller, 2008, Helsten et al., 2008, Loer et al., 2008, O'Reilly et al., 2008, Chanana et al., 2007, Conder et al., 2007, Dominguez-Gimenez et al., 2007, Fernández-Miñán et al., 2007, James et al., 2007, Korey et al., 2007, Murakami et al., 2007, Nguyen et al., 2007, Peralta et al., 2007, Tanentzapf et al., 2007, Bhandari et al., 2006, Bunch et al., 2006, Homsy et al., 2006, Levi et al., 2006, Tanentzapf and Brown, 2006, Goddeeris et al., 2003, Ayyub and Paranjape, 2002, Gullberg et al., 1994, Lindsley and Zimm, 1992)
      non-jumper-42
      olfactory C
      ΒPS integrin
      β-PS-integrin
      β1 integrin
      β1-integrin
      βPS integrin
      βPS integrin subunit
      βmys-integrin
      βPS Integrin subunit
      βPS.*integrin
      Secondary FlyBase IDs
      • FBgn0001448
      • FBgn0001811
      • FBgn0002992
      • FBgn0020759
      • FBgn0025177
      • FBgn0027260
      • FBgn0028333
      • FBgn0029991
      Datasets (0)
      Study focus (0)
      Experimental Role
      Project
      Project Type
      Title
      References (613)