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General Information
Symbol
Dmel\ci
Species
D. melanogaster
Name
cubitus interruptus
Annotation Symbol
CG2125
Feature Type
FlyBase ID
FBgn0004859
Gene Model Status
Stock Availability
Gene Snapshot
cubitus interruptus (ci) encodes a Zn-finger family of transcription factor. It contributes to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway that is involved in pattern formation and growth control. The product of ci undergoes limited proteolysis to be converted into a truncated form that function as a transcription repressor in the absence of the ligand encoded by hh but is converted into a full-length transcription activator in the presence of the product of hh. [Date last reviewed: 2019-03-07]
Also Known As
l(4)17, ciD, CID, l(4)13, ci-D
Key Links
Genomic Location
Cytogenetic map
Sequence location
4:47,710..57,041 [-]
Recombination map
4-0
Sequence
Other Genome Views
The following external sites may use different assemblies or annotations than FlyBase.
Function
GO Summary Ribbons
Protein Family (UniProt)
Belongs to the GLI C2H2-type zinc-finger protein family. (P19538)
Summaries
Gene Group (FlyBase)
C2H2 ZINC FINGER TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS -
Zinc finger C2H2 transcription factors are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that regulate transcription. They possess DNA-binding domains that are formed from repeated Cys2His2 zinc finger motifs. (Adapted from PMID:1835093, FBrf0220103 and FBrf0155739).
Pathway (FlyBase)
Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Core Components -
The hedgehog signaling pathway is initiated by hedgehog (hh) ligand binding to the extracellular domain of patched receptor (ptc), leading to the derepression of smoothened (smo) activity. Activation of the atypical GPCR smo results in the accumulation of the transcriptional activator form of cubitus interruptus (ci) and the derepression/activation of hh target genes. In the absence of hh, smo is repressed by ptc and ci is processed to a truncated repressor form. (Adapted from FBrf0220683 and FBrf0231236).
Protein Function (UniProtKB)
Has a dual function as a transcriptional activator and a repressor of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway. The full-length ci form (ciFL), acts as an activator (ciA) while ciR, its C-terminally truncated form, acts as a repressor. Involved in segment polarity. Required for the normal development of the posterior half of each embryonic segment. Engrailed protein directly represses ci expression in posterior compartment cells. Essential component of a hh-signaling pathway which regulates the Duox-dependent gut immune response to bacterial uracil; required to activate Cad99C-dependent endosome formation, norpA-dependent Ca2+ mobilization and p38 MAPK, which are essential steps in the Duox-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to intestinal bacterial infection (PubMed:25639794).
(UniProt, P19538)
Phenotypic Description (Red Book; Lindsley and Zimm 1992)
Ce: Cell
Ocelli reduced or absent; ocellar and scutellar bristles absent; interocellar microchaetae disrupted but frontals normal; postverticals short, thick, often with an adventitious pair between the normally placed postvertical bristles. Wing veins L3 and L4 converge, giving wing phenotype much like fu although wing phenotype variable. Homozygous lethal; lethality occurs during embryonic period (Hochman). Shown to be a segment polarity gene; homozygous embryos exhibit loss of the naked cuticle in the posterior half of each segment plus the anterior margin of the adjacent segment; most dorsal pattern elements also eliminated, leaving a lawn of fine hairs. Engrailed-antibody staining fails to detect a subset of CNS neurons in Ce homozygotes that are normally stained in wild-type embryos (Patel, Schafer, Goodman, and Holmgren, 1989, Genes Dev. 3: 890-904). No maternal requirement of Ce+ for either oogenesis or embryonic phenotype (Orenic, Chidsey, and Holmgrern, 1987, Dev. Biol. 124: 50-56). Lethal phenotype of Ce not complemented by l(4)17 or by induced revertants of the wing phenotype of ciD (Orenic et al.); pupal lethal in combination with ciD [Hochman, 1976, The Genetics and Biology of Drosophila (Ashburner and Novitski, eds.). Academic Press, London, New York, San Francisco, Vol. 1b, pp. 902-28]. RK3.
ci: cubitus interruptus
thumb
ci: cubitus interruptus
Wings showing from no interruption (extreme left) to complete absence (extreme right) of the cubital vein. From Stern and Kodani, 1955, Genetics 40: 343-73.
Vein L4 shows one or more gaps both distal and proximal to posterior crossvein, generally nonterminal. Anterior crossvein shortened or absent. Other gaps and scattered branch veins in region of crossveins. At 19, nearly all flies have a mutant phenotype; at 25, there is slight overlap with wild type; at 30, virtually all flies are wild type. Dosage effect such that ci/0 haplo-4's are more extreme than ci/ci diplo-4's, which are more extreme than ci/ci/ci triplo-4's. Suppressed by su(Hw)2 (Kotarski). For interactions of ci with en, H, ve, and cg, see House (1953, Genetics 38: 199-214, 309-27; 1955, Anat. Record 122: 471; 1959, Genetics, 44: 516; 1961, Genetics, 46: 871). Expression of ci sensitive to genetic background; selection possible for more and less extreme phenotypes (House and Yeatts, 1962, Genetics 47: 960); contribution of chromosome 2 more important than that of 3 (House and Pernaveau, 1971, Genetics 68: s29). Phenotypic effect visible in prepupa by absence of the longer longitudinal vein. RK1 at 19 and higher rank with higher temperatures.
*ci+2: cubitus interruptus-wild-type isoallele
Homozygote wild type at 14 and 26. ci+2/Df(4)M wild type at 26; shows some thinning and interruption of L4 at 14. ci+2/ci wild type at 26; at 14, fewer flies show thinning or interruption of L4 than ci+C/ci. ci+2/ciW shows significantly greater amount of thinning and interruption of L4 than ci+C/ciW. RK3.
ciD: cubitus interruptus-Dominant
Wings show interruptions of L4 in two places: proximal to and distal to anterior crossvein. L5 also shows distal interruption. L3 and L5 thick. Considerable plexus effect and knotting of veins. Wings broader, warped or concave upward, regularly extended, and bent backward. Alula fused with and in same plane as blade of wing. Black dried haemolymph from axillary spiracle. Slight scalloping of inner wing margin, with hairs and tufts. Direction and extent of temperature effects depends on genetic background (Scharloo). In general, no overlapping of wild type. Inviable in combination with Ax/Ax or Ax/Y (House and Lutes, 1975, Genetics 80: 542-43). H/+ inhibits scalloping of ciD but greatly enhances L4 interruption (House, 1959, Genetics 44: 516). Fully dominant in triplo-4's (Sturtevant, 1936, Genetics 21: 448). Two doses of ciD reduce survival of triplo-4 flies (Parker, 1969, Mutat. Res. 7: 393-407). Homozygotes lethal in embryo (Hochman, 1971, Genetics 67: 235-52). Embryonic segment polarity disrupted; anterior portions of segments with their denticle belts duplicated in mirror-image fashion; posterior portions missing; each segment almost entirely covered with denticles (Nusslein-Volhard and Wieschaus, 1980, Nature 287: 795-801). Fine hairs eliminated from dorsal abdominal segments; replaced with clear cuticle and socketed denticles (Orenic, Chidsey, and Holmgren, 1987, Dev. Biol. 124: 50-56). Embryonic CNS relatively normal (Patel, Schafer, Goodman, and Holmgren, 1989, Genes Dev. 3: 890-904). Genotype of oocyte with respect to ciD without effect on phenotype of progeny (Orenic et al.). ciD/l(4)102ABc dies as embryo, ciD/l(4)102ABb as embryo or larva; in ciD/Ce2 death usually delayed until pupal stage (Hochman, 1971). Survival of ci/ciD/Df(4)M101-63a argues for nonallelism or pseudoallelism of ci and ciD (Hochman, 1971). RK1.
ciW: cubitus interruptus of Wallace
Homozygote is extreme ci type. Wings sometimes almost twice normal width, arclike, and virtually lack veins. Often present is a well-organized pattern of venation in which the posterior crossvein flows smoothly into L5. Legs lumpy, sex combs larger than normal, antennae enlarged, eyes smaller, and extra bristles present. Heterozygote shows gap in L4 in 80% of flies. ciW enhanced by H, en, and Cy (House, 1953, Genetics 38: 669-70; 1959, Genetics 44: 516) and by Tp(4;Y) (Benner, 1972, Genetics 71: s4). Temperature effect described by House (1955, Genetics 40: 576). RK2.
Summary (Interactive Fly)
Gene Model and Products
Number of Transcripts
3
Number of Unique Polypeptides
3

Please see the GBrowse view of Dmel\ci or the JBrowse view of Dmel\ci for information on other features

To submit a correction to a gene model please use the Contact FlyBase form

Protein Domains (via Pfam)
Isoform displayed:
Pfam protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Protein Domains (via SMART)
Isoform displayed:
SMART protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Comments on Gene Model
Gene model reviewed during 5.39
Low-frequency RNA-Seq exon junction(s) not annotated.
Gene model reviewed during 5.46
Multiphase exon postulated: exon reading frame differs in alternative transcripts.
Sequence Ontology: Class of Gene
Transcript Data
Annotated Transcripts
Name
FlyBase ID
RefSeq ID
Length (nt)
Assoc. CDS (aa)
FBtr0089178
4941
1397
FBtr0306168
5191
1279
FBtr0308074
4874
572
Additional Transcript Data and Comments
Reported size (kB)
4.6 (northern blot)
Comments
External Data
Crossreferences
Polypeptide Data
Annotated Polypeptides
Name
FlyBase ID
Predicted MW (kDa)
Length (aa)
Theoretical pI
RefSeq ID
GenBank
FBpp0088245
153.3
1397
7.21
FBpp0297298
140.6
1279
7.24
FBpp0300417
61.8
572
7.85
Polypeptides with Identical Sequences

None of the polypeptides share 100% sequence identity.

Additional Polypeptide Data and Comments
Reported size (kDa)
Comments
External Data
Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)
Interacts with RDX (PubMed:16740475). Interacts with cos (PubMed:9244298, PubMed:15691767). Interacts with slmb; the interaction is enhanced by phosphorylation by CkIalpha and dco (PubMed:16326393).
(UniProt, P19538)
Post Translational Modification
Polyubiquitinated by RDX in the presence of CUL3, which results in proteasomal degradation. Phosphorylated on multiple sites by protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylation by PKA primes further phosphorylation by CK1 and GSK3. Phosphorylation is essential for its proteolytic processing. cos recruits multiple kinases to promote efficient phosphorylation of ci while Hh signaling inhibits phosphorylation by restricting the accessibility of ci to the kinases (PubMed:15691767). Phosphorylation by CkIalpha and dco enhances binding to Slmb, the F-box recognition component of the SCF(slmb) E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase required for ci processing (PubMed:16326393). Transcriptional repressor ciR, a C-terminally truncated form, is generated from the full-length ci (ciFL/ci-155) through proteolytic processing. Hh suppresses the formation of ci75 and promotes the conversion of ci155 into a transcriptional activator (ci155A).
(UniProt, P19538)
Crossreferences
InterPro - A database of protein families, domains and functional sites
Linkouts
Sequences Consistent with the Gene Model
Mapped Features

Click to get a list of regulatory features (enhancers, TFBS, etc.) and gene disruptions (point mutations, indels, etc.) within or overlapping Dmel\ci using the Feature Mapper tool.

External Data
Crossreferences
Eukaryotic Promoter Database - A collection of databases of experimentally validated promoters for selected model organisms.
Linkouts
Gene Ontology (32 terms)
Molecular Function (8 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (7 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
non-traceable author statement
(assigned by UniProt )
Biological Process (19 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (16 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:nej; FB:FBgn0261617
inferred from direct assay
inferred from mutant phenotype
(assigned by UniProt )
inferred from direct assay
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:ptc; FB:FBgn0003892
inferred from expression pattern
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:fu; FB:FBgn0001079
inferred from genetic interaction with FLYBASE:hh; FB:FBgn0004644
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (3 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
traceable author statement
non-traceable author statement
(assigned by UniProt )
Cellular Component (5 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (5 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
non-traceable author statement
(assigned by UniProt )
Expression Data
Expression Summary Ribbons
Colored tiles in ribbon indicate that expression data has been curated by FlyBase for that anatomical location. Colorless tiles indicate that there is no curated data for that location.
For complete stage-specific expression data, view the modENCODE Development RNA-Seq section under High-Throughput Expression below.
Transcript Expression
No Assay Recorded
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
in situ
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
dorsal ectoderm anlage

Comment: anlage in statu nascendi

ventral ectoderm anlage

Comment: anlage in statu nascendi

antennal anlage in statu nascendi

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage in statu nascendi

dorsal head epidermis anlage in statu nascendi

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage in statu nascendi

visual anlage in statu nascendi

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage in statu nascendi

Comment: expressed in three broad stripes

antennal anlage

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage

central brain anlage

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage

dorsal head epidermis anlage

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage

visual anlage

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm anlage

antennal primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

central brain primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

visual primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

dorsal head epidermis primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

lateral head epidermis primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

ventral head epidermis primordium

Comment: reported as procephalic ectoderm primordium

dorsal epidermis primordium

Comment: reported as dorsal epidermis anlage

RT-PCR
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Additional Descriptive Data
Expression of ci in the wing disc does not overlaps that of en.
The ci transcript is expressed in the anterior compartment of each segment during embryogenesis.
In wghs.PN embryos, after heat shock, ci transcripts become restricted to those cells that are outside the expanded en domain and coincide with the ptc stripe. This is a similar expression pattern to that found in nkd mutant embryos.
ci is expressed ubiquitously in early embryos. Expression later resolves into 15 stripes encompassing the anterior compartment of each segment. ci is also expressed in the anterior compartments of imaginal discs. In engrailed mutants, ci expression is derepressed in the posterior compartments, suggesting that ci expression is normally repressed by en in these cells.
ci is uniformly expressed throughout the cellular blastoderm and at gastrulation. At germband extension, expression resolves into 15 broad stripes that encompass the anterior 3/4 of each segment. ci transcripts are also found in the hindgut and foregut. Expression peaks at 5-8hrs of embryonic development.
Marker for
 
Subcellular Localization
CV Term
Polypeptide Expression
distribution deduced from reporter
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
immunolocalization
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
immunoprecipitation
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
mass spectroscopy
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Additional Descriptive Data
Strong ci protein accumulation is observed at the morphogenetic furrow.
ci protein is present in both the posterior optic lobe and adjacent anterior optic lobe cells in mid stage 11 embryos. It is also expressed broadly in tracheal pits.
Full length ci levels are low in 2-4 cells anterior to the A/P boundary and high in a more anterior regions. This is an inverse pattern to the rdx distribution.
ci protein is expressed at similar levels in wing and haltere discs.
ci protein is localized to the anterior compartment of the wing disc.
Immunoreactivity to ci protein detected throughout the anterior compartment of the wing disc, and is most pronounced along the anterior/posterior compartment boundary
The segmentally repeated expression of ci protein does not overlap the expression of en protein.
The full length ci protein is detected primarily near the anterior/posterior compartment boundary in the anterior compartment, with lower levels detected elsewhere as determined by an antibody that is specific for the full length protein. Cellular fractionation indicates that full length ci protein is cytoplasmic.
Marker for
Subcellular Localization
CV Term
Evidence
References
Expression Deduced from Reporters
Reporter: P{1.2prx-ci}
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Reporter: P{1.6dis-ci57g+HS}
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Reporter: P{2.2dis-ci+HS}
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Reporter: P{7.1-ci}
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference

Comment: expressed in two broad stripes

Reporter: P{ci-GAL4.C}
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Reporter: P{lacW}Dplac
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
High-Throughput Expression Data
Associated Tools

GBrowse - Visual display of RNA-Seq signals

View Dmel\ci in GBrowse 2
RNA-Seq by Region - Search RNA-Seq expression levels by exon or genomic region
Reference
See Gelbart and Emmert, 2013 for analysis details and data files for all genes.
Developmental Proteome: Life Cycle
Developmental Proteome: Embryogenesis
External Data and Images
Linkouts
BDGP expression data - Patterns of gene expression in Drosophila embryogenesis
FLIGHT - Cell culture data for RNAi and other high-throughput technologies
FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
Images
FlyExpress - Embryonic expression images (BDGP data)
  • Stages(s) 4-6
  • Stages(s) 7-8
  • Stages(s) 9-10
  • Stages(s) 11-12
  • Stages(s) 13-16
Alleles, Insertions, and Transgenic Constructs
Classical and Insertion Alleles ( 39 )
For All Classical and Insertion Alleles Show
 
Other relevant insertions
Transgenic Constructs ( 157 )
For All Alleles Carried on Transgenic Constructs Show
Transgenic constructs containing/affecting coding region of ci
Transgenic constructs containing regulatory region of ci
Deletions and Duplications ( 20 )
Phenotypes
For more details about a specific phenotype click on the relevant allele symbol.
Lethality
Allele
Sterility
Allele
Other Phenotypes
Allele
Phenotype manifest in
Allele
glial cell & eye disc | somatic clone, with Scer\GAL4Act5C.PP
lamina & neuron | precursor, with Scer\GAL4αTub84B.PP
leg (with ciD)
leg (with ciW)
wing vein L4 & sensillum campaniformium | ectopic | somatic clone
wing vein L4 & wing sensillum | ectopic | somatic clone
Orthologs
Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1)
Homo sapiens (Human) (6)
Species\Gene Symbol
Score
Best Score
Best Reverse Score
Alignment
Complementation?
Transgene?
11 of 15
Yes
Yes
 
 
10 of 15
No
Yes
7 of 15
No
Yes
 
2 of 15
No
No
2 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
Yes
Model Organism Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1)
Mus musculus (laboratory mouse) (6)
Species\Gene Symbol
Score
Best Score
Best Reverse Score
Alignment
Complementation?
Transgene?
10 of 15
Yes
Yes
8 of 15
No
Yes
7 of 15
No
Yes
2 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
Yes
Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat) (5)
8 of 13
Yes
Yes
7 of 13
No
Yes
5 of 13
No
Yes
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
Yes
Xenopus tropicalis (Western clawed frog) (3)
5 of 12
Yes
Yes
4 of 12
No
Yes
3 of 12
No
Yes
Danio rerio (Zebrafish) (6)
6 of 15
Yes
Yes
6 of 15
Yes
Yes
6 of 15
Yes
Yes
5 of 15
No
Yes
2 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode, roundworm) (3)
5 of 15
Yes
Yes
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
Yes
Arabidopsis thaliana (thale-cress) (1)
1 of 9
Yes
Yes
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) (2)
1 of 15
Yes
No
1 of 15
Yes
Yes
Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Fission yeast) (1)
1 of 12
Yes
No
Orthologs in Drosophila Species (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091900PB )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
AAA Syntenic Ortholog
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Drosophila melanogaster
fruit fly
Drosophila suzukii
Spotted wing Drosophila
Drosophila simulans
Drosophila sechellia
Drosophila erecta
Drosophila yakuba
Drosophila ananassae
Drosophila pseudoobscura pseudoobscura
Drosophila persimilis
Drosophila willistoni
Drosophila virilis
Drosophila mojavensis
Drosophila grimshawi
Orthologs in non-Drosophila Dipterans (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091500PV )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Musca domestica
House fly
Glossina morsitans
Tsetse fly
Lucilia cuprina
Australian sheep blowfly
Mayetiola destructor
Hessian fly
Aedes aegypti
Yellow fever mosquito
Anopheles darlingi
American malaria mosquito
Anopheles gambiae
Malaria mosquito
Culex quinquefasciatus
Southern house mosquito
Orthologs in non-Dipteran Insects (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090W0100 )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Bombyx mori
Silkmoth
Danaus plexippus
Monarch butterfly
Heliconius melpomene
Postman butterfly
Apis florea
Little honeybee
Apis mellifera
Western honey bee
Bombus impatiens
Common eastern bumble bee
Bombus terrestris
Buff-tailed bumblebee
Linepithema humile
Argentine ant
Megachile rotundata
Alfalfa leafcutting bee
Nasonia vitripennis
Parasitic wasp
Dendroctonus ponderosae
Mountain pine beetle
Tribolium castaneum
Red flour beetle
Pediculus humanus
Human body louse
Rhodnius prolixus
Kissing bug
Cimex lectularius
Bed bug
Acyrthosiphon pisum
Pea aphid
Zootermopsis nevadensis
Nevada dampwood termite
Orthologs in non-Insect Arthropods (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090X00Y7 )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Strigamia maritima
European centipede
Strigamia maritima
European centipede
Ixodes scapularis
Black-legged tick
Ixodes scapularis
Black-legged tick
Stegodyphus mimosarum
African social velvet spider
Stegodyphus mimosarum
African social velvet spider
Stegodyphus mimosarum
African social velvet spider
Tetranychus urticae
Two-spotted spider mite
Daphnia pulex
Water flea
Orthologs in non-Arthropod Metazoa (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091G01XS )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Purple sea urchin
Ciona intestinalis
Vase tunicate
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Paralogs
Paralogs (via DIOPT v7.1)
Drosophila melanogaster (Fruit fly) (3)
2 of 10
1 of 10
1 of 10
Human Disease Associations
FlyBase Human Disease Model Reports
Disease Model Summary Ribbon
Disease Ontology (DO) Annotations
Models Based on Experimental Evidence ( 1 )
Allele
Disease
Evidence
References
Potential Models Based on Orthology ( 5 )
Human Ortholog
Disease
Evidence
References
model of  polydactyly
inferred from electronic annotation
inferred from electronic annotation
inferred from electronic annotation
inferred from electronic annotation
inferred from electronic annotation
Modifiers Based on Experimental Evidence ( 1 )
Allele
Disease
Interaction
References
Comments on Models/Modifiers Based on Experimental Evidence ( 0 )
 
Disease Associations of Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v7.1 and OMIM)
Note that ortholog calls supported by only 1 or 2 algorithms (DIOPT score < 3) are not shown.
Functional Complementation Data
Functional complementation data is computed by FlyBase using a combination of the orthology data obtained from DIOPT and OrthoDB and the allele-level genetic interaction data curated from the literature.
Dmel gene
Ortholog showing functional complementation
Supporting References
Interactions
Summary of Physical Interactions
esyN Network Diagram
Show neighbor-neighbor interactions:
Select Layout:
Legend:
Protein
RNA
Selected Interactor(s)
Interactions Browser

Please see the Physical Interaction reports below for full details
protein-protein
Physical Interaction
Assay
References
Summary of Genetic Interactions
esyN Network Diagram
esyN Network Key:
Suppression
Enhancement

Please look at the allele data for full details of the genetic interactions
Starting gene(s)
Interaction type
Interacting gene(s)
Reference
suppressible
suppressible
suppressible
suppressible
suppressible
suppressible
suppressible
Starting gene(s)
Interaction type
Interacting gene(s)
Reference
External Data
Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)
Interacts with RDX (PubMed:16740475). Interacts with cos (PubMed:9244298, PubMed:15691767). Interacts with slmb; the interaction is enhanced by phosphorylation by CkIalpha and dco (PubMed:16326393).
(UniProt, P19538 )
Linkouts
BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
MIST (genetic) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
MIST (protein-protein) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
Pathways
Gene Group - Pathway Membership (FlyBase)
Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Core Components -
The hedgehog signaling pathway is initiated by hedgehog (hh) ligand binding to the extracellular domain of patched receptor (ptc), leading to the derepression of smoothened (smo) activity. Activation of the atypical GPCR smo results in the accumulation of the transcriptional activator form of cubitus interruptus (ci) and the derepression/activation of hh target genes. In the absence of hh, smo is repressed by ptc and ci is processed to a truncated repressor form. (Adapted from FBrf0220683 and FBrf0231236).
External Data
Genomic Location and Detailed Mapping Data
Chromosome (arm)
4
Recombination map
4-0
Cytogenetic map
Sequence location
4:47,710..57,041 [-]
FlyBase Computed Cytological Location
Cytogenetic map
Evidence for location
102A1-102A3
Limits computationally determined from genome sequence between P{SUPor-P}KG01127&PBac{5HPw+}A173 and PBac{5HPw+}A437
Experimentally Determined Cytological Location
Cytogenetic map
Notes
References
101F2-102A5
101F-101F
(determined by in situ hybridisation)
Experimentally Determined Recombination Data
Left of (cM)
Right of (cM)
Notes
Stocks and Reagents
Stocks (156)
Genomic Clones (7)
 

Please Note FlyBase no longer curates genomic clone accessions so this list may not be complete

cDNA Clones (103)
 

Please Note This section lists cDNAs and ESTs that fall within the genomic extent of the gene model, which may include cDNAs and ESTs of genes within introns, or of overlapping genes. Please see GBrowse for alignment of the cDNAs and ESTs to the gene model.

cDNA clones, fully sequences
BDGP DGC clones
Other clones
Drosophila Genomics Resource Center cDNA clones

For each fully sequenced cDNA the DGRC maintains various forms of the cDNA (e.g tagged or untagged) in several different host vectors for subsequent cloning and expression in Drosophila and Drosophila cell lines.

cDNA Clones, End Sequenced (ESTs)
RNAi and Array Information
Linkouts
DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
Antibody Information
Laboratory Generated Antibodies
Commercially Available Antibodies
 
Other Information
Relationship to Other Genes
Source for database identify of
Source for identity of: ci CG2125
Source for database merge of
Additional comments
Other Comments
The stability of endogenous ci protein is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not lysosome-mediated protein degradation.
The 'N-terminal Regulatory' (NR) domain of the ci protein is necessary for cytoplasmic retention of ci. The domain containing the first two zinc-fingers is necessary for processing of the ci protein into its repressor form.
dsRNA has been made from templates generated with primers directed against this gene. RNAi of ci causes a loss of dorsal class I da neurons without affecting the ventral class I neuron vpda and an overall reduction of dorsal md neurons. ci RNAi causes embryonic lethality at high concentrations of dsRNA. RNAi also causes defects in muscle, defects in the epidermis, alterations in the number of MD neurons and defects in dendrite morphogenesis.
ci enters the nucleus in response to hh signaling.
Processing of ci-155 to the repressor ci-75 is mediated by direct binding to slmb.
Cell culture experiments show that ci acts downstream of smo.
ChEST reveals this is a target of Mef2.
One of 42 Drosophila genes identified as being most likely to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms of nervous system development or plasticity relevant to human Mental Retardation disorders.
dsRNA made from templates generated with primers directed against this gene tested in RNAi screen for effects on Kc167 and S2R+ cell morphology.
ci, tsh and arm may act as a complex.
Different combinations of the proteins ci, tsh and arm appear to be employed for the specification of naked cuticle at distinct positions both along the anterior posterior axis and within individual trunk segments.
The analysis of target gene expression and morphogenetic read-outs of hh in embryonic, larval and adult stages indicates that ci is absolutely required for all examined aspects of hh outputs.
nej function is necessary for ci-mediated transactivation of wg during embryogenesis.
cg is required for the correct regulation of ci in limb development.
ci mediated activation of vn expression by hh requires the C terminus region of the ci protein.
Proteolysis of ci requires phosphorylation by PKA.
The hh signalling components smo and ci are required in cells posterior to hh to maintain ptc expression, whereas fu is not necessary in these cells.
There are three levels of apparent ci activity in the wing disc, corresponding to three zones along the antero-posterior axis with different sets of gene expression and different levels of hh signaling.
PKA inhibits the activity of full-length ci protein in addition to its role in regulating ci proteolysis.
ci null alleles are partially functionally complemented by Hsap\GLI, which rescues viability to late third instar, but produces larvae with grossly enlarged wing discs. ci null alleles are also partially functionally complemented by a combination of Hsap\GLI and Hsap\GLI3, rescuing to pupal or late third instar larvae and producing wild-type wing discs.
Modulation of the hh signaling pathway by Rnor\KAPA occurs directly at the level of ci phosphorylation.
Using the yeast two-hybrid method and an in vitro binding assay it is demonstrated that Su(fu), ci and fu can interact directly to form a trimolecular complex, with Su(fu) binding to both its partners simultaneously. In the absence of hh signalling results propose that Su(fu) inhibits ci by binding to it and that, upon reception of the hh signal, fu is activated and counteracts Su(fu), leading to the activation of ci.
CrebA ci double mutant phenotype confirms that CrebA is not involved in segment polarity.
Characterisation of ci protein reveals it exists in at least two forms, one full-length and the other truncated, these forms differ in activity and subcellular location. The N-terminal domain has nuclear localisation and DNA binding activities that are impotent in the full-length protein. Processing of the full length protein is inhibited by hh, an observation that represents the first direct evidence that ci transduces the hh signal.
Each primordia of the genital disc (female genital, male genital and anal primordia) is divided into anterior and posterior compartments. Genes known to be expressed in compartment-specific manner in discs are expressed in analogous patterns in each primordia.
Genetic combinations with mutants of nub cause additive phenotypes.
ci forms a negative feedback loop with ptc and regulates expression of hh target genes.
hh elicits signal transduction via a complex that includes the products of the fu, ci and cos genes. The complex binds with high affinity to microtubules in the absence of hh protein, but not when hh is present. The complex may facilitate signalling from hh by governing access of the ci product to the nucleus.
The ci protein associates with the cos product in a large protein complex, suggesting that cos directly controls the activity of ci.
The pattern of expression of ci in the larval and adult abdomen has been analysed.
hh and ptc can regulate transcription from a wg enhancer element containing ci protein binding sites by modulating the activity of ci protein.
ci encodes a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that functions as a transcriptional activator in the hh signal transduction pathway.
Elevated levels of ci are sufficient to activate hh target genes, even in the absence of hh activity. Results strongly support a role for ci as the transcriptional activator that mediates hh signaling.
Cells in anterior compartments lacking ci express hh and adopt a posterior fate without expressing en. Increased levels of ci can induce the expression of dpp independent of hh. Expression of ci in anterior cells controls limb development by restricting hh secretion to posterior cells and by conferring competence to respond to hh by mediating transduction of the hh signal.
ptc and ci are expressed in a pattern complementary to hh and en in adult ovaries. hh directly effects region 2 somatic cells of the germarium via a signalling pathway which includes ptc and ci, but not wg or dpp.
The expression pattern of a number of genes in the larval genital discs, including ci, has been studied to determine the segment-parasegment organisation of the genital discs.
ara-caup expression at patches on the wing, located one at each side of the DV compartment border, is mediated by the hh signal through its induction of high levels of ci protein in anterior cells near to the AP compartment border. High levels of ci activate dpp expression and together ci and dpp positively control ara-caup expression.
Elevated en levels repress dpp, ptc and ci expression but do not disrupt eye morphogenesis.
en+ is a dose-dependent modifier of the ci locus. Lack of pairing at the ci locus can facilitate the en--dependent expression of the ci phenotypes.
The distribution of the ci protein during development is examined and epistasis analysis is used to position ci in the wg and hh signalling pathways. fu and hh modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of ci protein. ci is epistatic to ptc in the maintenance of wg expression and the formation of naked cuticle.
Ecol\lacZ reporter gene constructs demonstrate that separate ci regulatory elements regulate ci expression in embryos and imaginal discs. The en protein directly represses ci expression in wing posterior compartment cells.
Proper regulation of both the ci RNA and protein appears to be critical for normal development.
Direct wg autoregulation differs from wg signalling to adjacent cells in the importance of fu, smo and ci relative to sgg and arm.
pan and ci loci display a complex complementation pattern: viable alleles of ci complement lethal alleles of ci and complement pan, of the lethal alleles of ci, ciD fails to complement pan and ciCe-r1, ciCe-2 fails to complement ciCe-r1.
fu and ci are required for normal wg transcription, acting downstream of ptc to regulate wg transcription. Transcriptional control of ptc is mediated by fu and ci.
Segment polarity mutations cause stripes of abnormal patterning within sectors of the leg disc, which may be mediated by regional perturbations in growth.
The role of ci in the regulation of run mRNA expression in the early embryo has been investigated.
Assayed in an analysis of chromosome 4 using pulsed field gel electrophoresis.
wg and en expression patterns are studied in all known segment polarity mutants to investigate the requirement of other segment polarity genes in mediating the maintenance of wg and en.
Ectopic uniform wg expression results in change in ci expression: ci expressed in those cells that are not expressing en (as in wild type), but since the en stripe is broader the ci stripe is thinner.
Mutations in ci cause pleiotropic phenotypes in embryonic patterns and affect several longitudinal veins.
Late ptc transcription patterns depend upon selective repression by ciD.
ve, vn, ci, cg, svs, ast, H, Vno and vvl belong to the vein phenotypic group (Puro, 1982, Droso. Info. Serv. 58:205--208 ) within the 'lack-of-vein' mutant class. Loss-of-function alleles at these loci remove stretches of veins in two or more longitudinal veins. Double mutations within members of this group remove all veins, have smaller, slightly lanceolate wings, no sensilla and extra chaetae.
ci has a specific role in the control of cell fates during neurogenesis.
The expression of ci+ can be altered in direction of ci by certain chromosome rearrangements that have one break in vicinity of ci locus. Rearranged fourth chromosomes carrying a mutant allele of ci, R(ci), may also show altered expression of gene (Stern and Kodani, 1955). R(ci) and R(ci+) terminology not retained here; interaction with ci included in descriptions of aberrations involving chromosome 4.
Origin and Etymology
Discoverer
Etymology
Identification
External Crossreferences and Linkouts ( 67 )
Sequence Crossreferences
NCBI Gene - Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes, and links to genome-, phenotype-, and locus-specific resources worldwide.
GenBank Nucleotide - A collection of sequences from several sources, including GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB.
GenBank Protein - A collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB.
RefSeq - A comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of reference sequences including genomic, transcript, and protein.
UniProt/Swiss-Prot - Manually annotated and reviewed records of protein sequence and functional information
UniProt/TrEMBL - Automatically annotated and unreviewed records of protein sequence and functional information
Other crossreferences
BDGP expression data - Patterns of gene expression in Drosophila embryogenesis
Drosophila Genomics Resource Center - Drosophila Genomics Resource Center (DGRC) cDNA clones
Eukaryotic Promoter Database - A collection of databases of experimentally validated promoters for selected model organisms.
Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
Reactome - An open-source, open access, manually curated and peer-reviewed pathway database.
GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
InterPro - A database of protein families, domains and functional sites
KEGG Genes - Molecular building blocks of life in the genomic space.
modMine - A data warehouse for the modENCODE project
SignaLink - A signaling pathway resource with multi-layered regulatory networks.
Linkouts
BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
FLIGHT - Cell culture data for RNAi and other high-throughput technologies
FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
FlyCyc Genes - Genes from a BioCyc PGDB for Dmel
FlyMine - An integrated database for Drosophila genomics
Interactive Fly - A cyberspace guide to Drosophila development and metazoan evolution
InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
KEGG Pathways - Wiring diagrams of molecular interactions, reactions and relations.
MIST (genetic) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
MIST (protein-protein) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
Synonyms and Secondary IDs (36)
Reported As
Symbol Synonym
Ci
(García-Morales et al., 2019, Meltzer et al., 2019, Giordano et al., 2018, Jiang et al., 2018, Kastl et al., 2018, Lee et al., 2018, Lehmann, 2018, Yu et al., 2018, Chambers et al., 2017, Chen et al., 2017, Liu and Jin, 2017, Pan et al., 2017, Smelkinson et al., 2017, Zhao et al., 2017, Kotov et al., 2016, Lee et al., 2016, Li et al., 2016, Ma et al., 2016, Mbodj et al., 2016, Saadin and Starz-Gaiano, 2016, Dorn and Dorn, 2015, Gurdziel et al., 2015, Im et al., 2015, Khaliullina et al., 2015, Lee et al., 2015, Liu et al., 2015, Oh et al., 2015, Vedanayagam and Garrigan, 2015, Xiong et al., 2015, Zhou et al., 2015, Butí et al., 2014, Goriaux et al., 2014, Jiang et al., 2014, Karandikar et al., 2014, Kuzhandaivel et al., 2014, Li et al., 2014, Li et al., 2014, Mao et al., 2014, Pichaud, 2014, Shi et al., 2014, Shi et al., 2014, Skwarek et al., 2014, Wang et al., 2014, Zhang et al., 2014, Zhang et al., 2014, Atkins et al., 2013, Avanesov and Blair, 2013, Bausek, 2013, Brianti et al., 2013, Briscoe and Thérond, 2013, Chen and Jiang, 2013, Christiansen et al., 2013, Da Ros et al., 2013, Degoutin et al., 2013, Ducuing et al., 2013, Fossett, 2013, Gao et al., 2013, Huang et al., 2013, Li et al., 2013, Palm et al., 2013, Ramos and Barolo, 2013, Serysheva et al., 2013, Serysheva et al., 2013, Shim et al., 2013, Tran et al., 2013, Wong et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Aikin et al., 2012, Amoyel and Bach, 2012, Avanesov et al., 2012, Carroll et al., 2012, Cheng et al., 2012, Christiansen et al., 2012, Kagey et al., 2012, Legent et al., 2012, Matakatsu and Blair, 2012, Robbins et al., 2012, Sánchez-Hernández et al., 2012, Singh and Mlodzik, 2012, Wu et al., 2012, Yue et al., 2012, Bangi et al., 2011, Becam et al., 2011, Callejo et al., 2011, Du et al., 2011, Hadjieconomou et al., 2011, Jiang et al., 2011, Liu et al., 2011, Michaut et al., 2011, Parker et al., 2011, Poon et al., 2011, Shi et al., 2011, Singh et al., 2011, Su et al., 2011, Terriente-Félix et al., 2011, Wang et al., 2011, Wojcinski et al., 2011, You et al., 2011, Zhang et al., 2011, Zhou and Kalderon, 2011, Brankatschk and Eaton, 2010, Camp et al., 2010, Chang et al., 2010, Cheng et al., 2010, Hartman et al., 2010, Jia et al., 2010, Kechris et al., 2010, Kim et al., 2010, Kugler and Nagel, 2010, Maurel-Zaffran et al., 2010, Neto-Silva et al., 2010, Raisin et al., 2010, Sen et al., 2010, Seong et al., 2010, Tamori et al., 2010, Usha and Shashidhara, 2010, Yan et al., 2010, Zheng et al., 2010, Ayers et al., 2009, Baker et al., 2009, Djagaeva and Doronkin, 2009, Farzan et al., 2009, Jia et al., 2009, Khaliullina et al., 2009, Nagaraj and Banerjee, 2009, Renault et al., 2009, Smith-Bolton et al., 2009, Yan et al., 2009, Zhang et al., 2009, Zhuang et al., 2009, Alexandre et al., 2008, Carrera et al., 2008, Casso et al., 2008, Fan and Bergmann, 2008, Friggi-Grelin et al., 2008, Gallet et al., 2008, Katanaev et al., 2008, Mitchell et al., 2008, Ogden et al., 2008, Sánchez et al., 2008, Schlichting and Dahmann, 2008, Shen et al., 2008, Takashima et al., 2008, Tien et al., 2008, Wang and Price, 2008, Zhang et al., 2008, Zhang et al., 2008, Bejarano et al., 2007, Chanana et al., 2007, Chien-Hsiang et al., 2007, Eugster et al., 2007, Farzan et al., 2007, Galletti et al., 2007, Giuliani et al., 2007, Kim et al., 2007, Kugler and Nagel, 2007, Molnar et al., 2007, Pfleger et al., 2007, Price et al., 2007, Ruel et al., 2007, Smelkinson et al., 2007, Sun and Deng, 2007, Sun and Deng, 2007, Tountas and Fortini, 2007, Umemori et al., 2007, Walthall et al., 2007, Zhao et al., 2007, Beach et al., 2006, Beenken and Mohammadi, 2006, Bossing and Brand, 2006, Callejo et al., 2006, Croker et al., 2006, Dussillol-Godar et al., 2006, Ference and Barolo, 2006, Fisher and Howie, 2006, Goodman et al., 2006, Ho et al., 2006, Jia and Jiang, 2006, Jones et al., 2006, Liu et al., 2006, Nolo et al., 2006, Ogden et al., 2006, Osterlund and Kogerman, 2006, Panakova and Eaton, 2006, Parrish et al., 2006, Sisson et al., 2006, Sisson et al., 2006, Smelkinson and Kalderon, 2006, Vrailas and Moses, 2006, Wilson and Chuang, 2006, Zhang et al., 2006, Zhou et al., 2006, Ziegenhorn et al., 2006, Ayyub et al., 2005, Chotard et al., 2005, Dawber et al., 2005, Hogarth et al., 2005, Holmgren et al., 2005, Horabin, 2005, Jia et al., 2005, Lim et al., 2005, Ma, 2005, Mandal et al., 2005, Tian et al., 2005, Torroja et al., 2005, Wei et al., 2005, Xie et al., 2005, Hime et al., 2004, Wang and Jiang, 2004, Heriche et al., 2003, Ascano et al., 2002, Monnier et al., 2002, Noureddine et al., 2002, Zhang et al., 2002, McNeill, 2000, Song et al., 2000, Wang et al., 2000)
ci
(Sun et al., 2019, Baldeosingh et al., 2018, Jia et al., 2018, Lv et al., 2018, Zhu et al., 2018, Aggarwal et al., 2017, Chabu et al., 2017, Garcia-Garcia et al., 2017, Lai et al., 2017, Transgenic RNAi Project members, 2017-, Bielmeier et al., 2016, Doiguchi et al., 2016, Jiang et al., 2016, Moulton and Letsou, 2016, Ray et al., 2016, Wieschaus and Nüsslein-Volhard, 2016, Willsey et al., 2016, Bosch et al., 2015, Li et al., 2015, Liu et al., 2015, Lu et al., 2015, Matsuda et al., 2015, Matsuda et al., 2015, Nadimpalli et al., 2015, Rudolf et al., 2015, Zhou et al., 2015, Bauerly et al., 2014, Ciglar et al., 2014, Herrera and Morata, 2014, Herz et al., 2014, Kim et al., 2014, Kim et al., 2014, Liu et al., 2014, Ranieri et al., 2014, Stern et al., 2014, Chai et al., 2013, Da Ros et al., 2013, Geisbrecht et al., 2013, Iyer et al., 2013, Saunders et al., 2013, Spratford and Kumar, 2013, Webber et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2013, Azad et al., 2012, Fan et al., 2012, Hurtado et al., 2012, Jimenez-Sanchez et al., 2012, Riddle et al., 2012, Sousa-Neves and Schinaman, 2012, Zhou et al., 2012, Callejo et al., 2011, Gibert et al., 2011, Karim and Moore, 2011, Marks and Kalderon, 2011, Pérez et al., 2011, Pilgram et al., 2011, Toku et al., 2011, Watson et al., 2011, Weake et al., 2011, Biehs et al., 2010, Chou et al., 2010, Firth et al., 2010, Jia et al., 2010, Kühnlein, 2010, Li et al., 2010, Pospisilik et al., 2010, Sato et al., 2010, Smolik, 2010.11.15, Subramanian and Gadgil, 2010, Wasbrough et al., 2010, Yavari et al., 2010, Zhou and Kalderon, 2010, Bejarano and Milán, 2009, Blanco et al., 2009, Chaves et al., 2009, Fang et al., 2009, Foronda et al., 2009, Julius et al., 2009, Landsberg et al., 2009, Mosimann et al., 2009, Mulinari and Häcker, 2009, Ni et al., 2009, Zúñiga et al., 2009, Chaves and Albert, 2008, Farzan et al., 2008, González et al., 2008, McDermott and Kliman, 2008, Ni et al., 2008, Prince et al., 2008, Tien et al., 2008, Bejarano et al., 2007, Beltran et al., 2007, Corrigall et al., 2007, Escudero and Freeman, 2007, Escudero et al., 2007, Makhijani et al., 2007, Malpel et al., 2007, Mandal et al., 2007, Ou et al., 2007, Quinones-Coello, 2007, D'Costa et al., 2006, Joshi et al., 2006, Kent et al., 2006, Masly et al., 2006, Ramos and Mohler, 2006, Smelkinson and Kalderon, 2006, Suh et al., 2006, Varjosalo et al., 2006, Wehn and Campbell, 2006, Wendler et al., 2006, Yao et al., 2006, Briscoe and Therond, 2005, Firth and Baker, 2005, Firth and Baker, 2005, Ishii, 2005, Nybakken et al., 2005, Zhang et al., 2005, Wang and Struhl, 2004, Heriche et al., 2003, Noor and Kliman, 2003, Sanchez and Guerrero, 2001, van Steensel and Henikoff, 2000, von Mering and Basler, 1999, Forbes et al., 1996, Freeland and Kuhn, 1996, Locke and Tartof, 1994, Orenic et al., 1987)
l(4)102ABc
Name Synonyms
Cell
Cubitis Interruptus
Cubitus Interuptus
Cubitus interuptus
Cubitus-interruptus
cubitis interruptus
cubitus-interruptus
cubitus-interruptus-Dominant
cubitus-interruptus-dominant
Secondary FlyBase IDs
  • FBgn0000314
  • FBgn0000315
  • FBgn0010154
  • FBgn0010155
  • FBgn0017411
  • FBgn0019831
Datasets (0)
Study focus (0)
Experimental Role
Project
Project Type
Title
References (1,052)