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Citation
Kourtis, N., Tavernarakis, N. (2009). Autophagy and cell death in model organisms.  Cell Death Differ. 16(1): 21--30.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0206516
Publication Type
Review
Abstract

Autophagy evolved in unicellular eukaryotes as a means for surviving nutrient stress. During the course of evolution, as multicellular organisms developed specialized cell types and complex intracellular signalling networks, autophagy has been summoned to serve additional cellular functions. Numerous recent studies indicate that apart from its pro-survival role under nutrient limitation, autophagy also participates in cell death. However, the precise role of this catabolic process in dying cells is not fully understood. Although in certain situations autophagy has a protective function, in other types of cell death it actually contributes to cellular destruction. Simple model organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the metazoans Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster provide clearly defined cell death paradigms that can be used to dissect the involvement of autophagy in cell death, at the molecular level. In this review, we survey current research in simple organisms, linking autophagy to cell death and discuss the complex interplay between autophagy, cell survival and cell death.

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    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    Cell Death Differ.
    Title
    Cell Death and Differentiation
    Publication Year
    1994-
    ISBN/ISSN
    1350-9047
    Data From Reference
    Gene Groups (1)
    Genes (14)