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Blum, A.L., Li, W., Cressy, M., Dubnau, J. (2009). Short- and long-term memory in Drosophila require cAMP signaling in distinct neuron types.  Curr. Biol. 19(16): 1341--1350.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0208576
Publication Type
Research paper
Abstract

A common feature of memory and its underlying synaptic plasticity is that each can be dissected into short-lived forms involving modification or trafficking of existing proteins and long-term forms that require new gene expression. An underlying assumption of this cellular view of memory consolidation is that these different mechanisms occur within a single neuron. At the neuroanatomical level, however, different temporal stages of memory can engage distinct neural circuits, a notion that has not been conceptually integrated with the cellular view.Here, we investigated this issue in the context of aversive Pavlovian olfactory memory in Drosophila. Previous studies have demonstrated a central role for cAMP signaling in the mushroom body (MB). The Ca(2+)-responsive adenylyl cyclase RUTABAGA is believed to be a coincidence detector in gamma neurons, one of the three principle classes of MB Kenyon cells. We were able to separately restore short-term or long-term memory to a rutabaga mutant with expression of rutabaga in different subsets of MB neurons.Our findings suggest a model in which the learning experience initiates two parallel associations: a short-lived trace in MB gamma neurons, and a long-lived trace in alpha/beta neurons.

PubMed ID
PubMed Central ID
PMC2752374 (PMC) (EuropePMC)
Related Publication(s)
Note

Fly memory: a mushroom body story in parts.
van Swinderen, 2009, Curr. Biol. 19(18): R855--R857 [FBrf0208932]

Parallel processing of olfactory memories in Drosophila.
Blum and Dubnau, 2010, Fly 4(2): 163--166 [FBrf0211080]

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Secondary IDs
    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    Curr. Biol.
    Title
    Current Biology
    Publication Year
    1991-
    ISBN/ISSN
    0960-9822
    Data From Reference