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Citation
McPhee, C.K., Baehrecke, E.H. (2010). The engulfment receptor Draper is required for autophagy during cell death.  Autophagy 6(8): 1192--1193.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0212291
Publication Type
Note
Abstract

Autophagy is a process to degrade and recycle cytoplasmic contents. Autophagy is required for survival in response to starvation, but has also been associated with cell death. How autophagy functions during cell survival in some contexts and cell death in others is unknown. Drosophila larval salivary glands undergo programmed cell death requiring autophagy genes, and are cleared in the absence of known phagocytosis. Recently, we demonstrated that Draper (Drpr), the Drosophila homolog of C. elegans engulfment receptor CED-1, is required for autophagy induction: during cell death, but not during cell survival. drpr mutants fail to clear salivary glands. drpr knockdown in salivary glands prevents the induction of autophagy, and Atg1 misexpression in drpr null mutants suppresses salivary gland persistence. Surprisingly, drpr knockdown cell-autonomously prevents autophagy induction in dying salivary gland cells, but not in larval fat body cells following starvation. This is the first engulfment factor shown to function in cellular self-clearance, and the first report of a cell-death-specific autophagy regulator.

PubMed ID
PubMed Central ID
PMC3039721 (PMC) (EuropePMC)
Related Publication(s)
Research paper

Activation of autophagy during cell death requires the engulfment receptor Draper.
McPhee et al., 2010, Nature 465(7301): 1093--1096 [FBrf0211145]

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Secondary IDs
    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    Autophagy
    Title
    Autophagy
    Publication Year
    2005-
    ISBN/ISSN
    1554-8627 1554-8635
    Data From Reference