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Citation
Nagy, P., Varga, A., Kovács, A.L., Takáts, S., Juhász, G. (2015). How and why to study autophagy in Drosophila: It's more than just a garbage chute.  Methods 75(): 151--161.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0227734
Publication Type
Research paper
Abstract
During the catabolic process of autophagy, cytoplasmic material is transported to the lysosome for degradation and recycling. This way, autophagy contributes to the homeodynamic turnover of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, glycogen, and even whole organelles. Autophagic activity is increased by adverse conditions such as nutrient limitation, growth factor withdrawal and oxidative stress, and it generally protects cells and organisms to promote their survival. Misregulation of autophagy is likely involved in numerous human pathologies including aging, cancer, infections and neurodegeneration, so its biomedical relevance explains the still growing interest in this field. Here we discuss the different microscopy-based, biochemical and genetic methods currently available to study autophagy in various tissues of the popular model Drosophila. We show examples for results obtained in different assays, explain how to interpret these with regard to autophagic activity, and how to find out which step of autophagy a given gene product is involved in.
PubMed ID
PubMed Central ID
PMC4358840 (PMC) (EuropePMC)
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    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    Methods
    Title
    Methods [Supplement to Methods Enzymol.]
    Publication Year
    1990-
    ISBN/ISSN
    1046-2023
    Data From Reference