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General Information
Symbol
Dmel\BxJ
Species
D. melanogaster
Name
of Jollos
FlyBase ID
FBal0001441
Feature type
allele
Associated gene
Associated Insertion(s)
Carried in Construct
Key Links
Allele class
Mutagen
Nature of the Allele
Allele class
Mutagen
Mutations Mapped to the Genome
 
Type
Location
Additional Notes
References
Associated Sequence Data
DNA sequence
Protein sequence
 
 
Progenitor genotype
Cytology
Nature of the lesion
Statement
Reference

The 3S18{}BxJ insertion is within the 3' untranslated region of Bx.

Insertion of approximately 8kb into the 3' UTR.

6.2 kb (3S18) insertion

Insertion components
3S18{}BxJ
Expression Data
Reporter Expression
Additional Information
Statement
Reference
 
Marker for
Reflects expression of
Reporter construct used in assay
Human Disease Associations
Disease Ontology (DO) Annotations
Models Based on Experimental Evidence ( 0 )
Disease
Evidence
References
Modifiers Based on Experimental Evidence ( 0 )
Disease
Interaction
References
Comments on Models/Modifiers Based on Experimental Evidence ( 0 )
 
Disease-implicated variant(s)
 
Phenotypic Data
Phenotypic Class
Phenotype Manifest In
Detailed Description
Statement
Reference

BxJ mutant larvae show reduced haemocyte counts while BxJ/BxJ and BxJ/+ mutants show higher numbers of larval crystal cells when compared to controls.

Homozygotes have small wings lacking much of the wing margin. Heterozygotes show a similar albeit weaker phenotype.

BxA523/BxJ wings are small and lack areas of wing margin. This phenotype is less severe than BxJ wings and is similar to BxJ /+ wings.

Mutant animals exhibit an decreased sensitivity to cocaine. After exposure to 100ug of cocaine, control animals show a slow circling behaviour and some are akinetic, mutant animals are much less affected, showing increased locomotion (mostly in straight lines) decreased slow circling, and almost no akinesia. Mutant animals, unlike controls which show very little movement, remain in motion at 125ug exposure showing circling behaviours.

Homozygotes exhibit tissue loss from the entire wing margin and blistering of the wing blade. The phenotype is unchanged in double homozygote combinations with ct53d.

The only dominant Bx allele not suppressed by a Bx deficiency or hdp.

Clonal analysis of wing disk development indicates massive cell loss during third larval instar. Clones of Bx+ cells in BxJ/+ wings that reach the margin but are confined to the dorsal or ventral surface often cause reconstitution of both surfaces and appearance of marginal elements derived from both surfaces.

Wings reduced to slender strip; only posterior cell present at tip. Heterozygous females have half and homozygous females one third the normal number of cells in membrane of wing. Femur shortened or legs otherwise abnormal, especially third pair. Halteres abnormal. Interacts with bi to give more nearly normal wings. RK1.

External Data
Interactions
Show genetic interaction network for Enhancers & Suppressors
Phenotypic Class
Phenotype Manifest In
Enhanced by
Statement
Reference

BxJ has wing phenotype, enhanceable by Ssdp11

BxJ has wing phenotype, enhanceable by Ssdp31

BxJ has wing phenotype, enhanceable by SsdpBG01663

BxJ has wing phenotype, enhanceable by Ssdpneo48

BxJ has wing phenotype, enhanceable by SsdpKG03600

NOT suppressed by
Statement
Reference

BxJ has phenotype, non-suppressible by su(Hw)2

Additional Comments
Genetic Interactions
Statement
Reference

The addition of SsdpKG03600, SsdpBG01663, Ssdpneo48, Ssdp31 or Ssdp11 enhances the wing scalloping phenotype seen in BxJ animals.

Xenogenetic Interactions
Statement
Reference
Complementation and Rescue Data
Comments
Images (0)
Mutant
Wild-type
Stocks (1)
Notes on Origin
Discoverer

Jollos, 1930.

Comments
Comments

"heat-treatment" was stated as tentative.

Alleles fall into an allelic series based on cocaine resistance phenotype. BxJ > Bx1 = Bx2 = Bx3.

External Crossreferences and Linkouts ( 0 )
Synonyms and Secondary IDs (4)
Reported As
Symbol Synonym
Name Synonyms
Pointedoid
of Jollos
Secondary FlyBase IDs
    References (19)