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General Information
Symbol
Dmel\hop
Species
D. melanogaster
Name
hopscotch
Annotation Symbol
CG1594
Feature Type
FlyBase ID
FBgn0004864
Gene Model Status
Stock Availability
Enzyme Name (EC)
Non-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (2.7.10.2)
Gene Summary
hopscotch (hop) encodes a non-receptor tyrosine kinase for interleukin-like ligands (encoded by upd1, upd2, and upd3) and functions in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. It is involved in embryonic segmentation, cell proliferation, and cell migration. [Date last reviewed: 2019-03-07] (FlyBase Gene Snapshot)
Also Known As

JAK, l(1)hop, DmHD-160, Tum, 4

Key Links
Genomic Location
Cytogenetic map
Sequence location
X:11,360,930..11,368,098 [-]
Recombination map
1-34
RefSeq locus
NC_004354 REGION:11360930..11368098
Sequence
Other Genome Views
The following external sites may use different assemblies or annotations than FlyBase.
Function
GO Summary Ribbons
Gene Ontology (GO) Annotations (38 terms)
Molecular Function (3 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (2 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from physical interaction with UniProtKB:M9NE35
inferred from physical interaction with UniProtKB:Q9VWE0
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
enables ATP binding
inferred from electronic annotation with InterPro:IPR000719, InterPro:IPR017441
(assigned by InterPro )
Biological Process (32 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (31 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
involved_in locomotor rhythm
inferred from mutant phenotype
involved_in long-term memory
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from direct assay
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
inferred from mutant phenotype
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
Cellular Component (3 terms)
Terms Based on Experimental Evidence (2 terms)
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from direct assay
located_in cytosol
inferred from direct assay
Terms Based on Predictions or Assertions (1 term)
CV Term
Evidence
References
located_in cytoskeleton
inferred from electronic annotation with InterPro:IPR000299
(assigned by InterPro )
Gene Group (FlyBase)
Protein Family (UniProt)
Belongs to the protein kinase superfamily. Tyr protein kinase family. JAK subfamily. (Q24592)
Catalytic Activity (EC)
Experimental Evidence
ATP + a [protein]-L-tyrosine = ADP + a [protein]-L-tyrosine phosphate (2.7.10.2)
Predictions / Assertions
-
Summaries
Gene Snapshot
hopscotch (hop) encodes a non-receptor tyrosine kinase for interleukin-like ligands (encoded by upd1, upd2, and upd3) and functions in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. It is involved in embryonic segmentation, cell proliferation, and cell migration. [Date last reviewed: 2019-03-07]
Gene Group (FlyBase)
NON-RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES -
Non-Receptor Tyrosine kinases (nRTK) are cytoplasmic protein kinases that specifically phosphorylate tyrosine residues. nRTKs are involved in signalling cascades and possess targeting domains such as SH2 domains. (Adapted from FBrf0132098).
Pathway (FlyBase)
JAK-STAT Signaling Pathway Core Components -
The JAK-STAT signaling pathway is initiated by the binding of an extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor leading to receptor dimerization and the intracellular activation of a Janus kinase (JAK) family member. JAK phosphorylates cytoplasmic STAT family members which dimerize, translocate into the nucleus and regulate target gene expression. In Drosophila, the core pathway is limited to three ligands (the Unpaired family of cytokines), a single receptor (dome), JAK kinase (hop) and STAT (Stat92E). (Adapted from FBrf0225259).
Protein Function (UniProtKB)
Tyrosine kinase of the non-receptor type, phosphorylates the marelle protein. Required maternally for the establishment of the normal array of embryonic segments: involved in the control of pair-rule gene transcription in a stripe-specific manner. Together with Hsp83 and piwi, mediates canalization, also known as developmental robustness, likely via epigenetic silencing of existing genetic variants and suppression of transposon-induced new genetic variation.
(UniProt, Q24592)
Phenotypic Description (Red Book; Lindsley and Zimm 1992)
hop: hopscotch
The wild-type allele of hop is required for the continued cell division of all diploid cells as well as the establishment of the normal array of segments. Most of the mutants are homozygous late zygotic (L-P) lethals; one mutant is a larval lethal; two other mutants have some adult survivors (hemizygous males being morphologaically normal, but 40% of the homzygous females and 85% of the hemizygous females showing major defects). Most of the heteroallelic females are lethal, with the following exceptions:
            
 
            genotype      percent viable 
            ____________________________ 
             
            hop29/hop25   12% 
            hop3/hop25    16% 
            hop14/hop25   40% 
            hop12/hop25   68% 
            hop27/hop25   100% 
            hop32/hop25   100% 
            hop33/hop25   100% 
             
             
             
All viable heteroallelic combinations are female sterile, failing to produce eggs or laying abnormal eggs that are small, with a clear chorion and with chorionic filaments absent or partially fused (Perrimon and Mahowald, 1986a). There is a maternal effect on thoracic and abdominal segments, the most extreme embryos [produced from homozygous l(1)hop germline clones that have not received a paternal copy of hop+] showing defects in the posterior spiracles and in segments T2 (denticle belt deleted). T3, A4, and A5 (segment missing) and A8 (segment reduced in size); the least extreme mutant embryos from germline clones show defects in segment A5. Defects visible in early segmentation stages. The extent of the defects is dependent on the strength of the maternal alleles and the paternal contribution. Wild-type sperm can rescue all defects, except those in A5. A few of the rescued progeny hatch and develop into adults.
Tum: Tumorous
Dominant tumorous gene that is a temperature-sensitive lethal at 29 in hemizygous males and homozygous females; about two-thirds of the hemizygous males survive at 18 and one-quarter of these have melanotic tumors. Males raised at 26 and heterozygous females raised at 29 survive to adulthood, but show melanotic masses in the abdominal cavity or small black specks in the legs, wings, or thorax. Mutant larvae kept at 29 show enlargement of the lymph glands in the late second- or early third-instar larvae, but no melanotic masses. By mid third-instar, the lymph glands are large and diffuse and the gastric caeca have become encapsulated and melanized. By late third-instar, the larvae have melanotic masses in the body cavity, lack lymph glands, and have reduced, encapsulated and melanized gastric caeca as well as encapsulated and melanized muscles and fat bodies. These mutants do not survive beyond the late third-instar or the early pupal stage. When lymph glands from Tum larvae are injected into adult female hosts, transplantable neoplasms are produced. Melanization, at first associated with the leg joints and later with the head, thorax, and abdomen, takes place; also abdominal bloating. The lymph glands become melanotic and the abdomen is filled with encapsulated masses before the premature death of the injected individuals. Injection of Tum tissue other than lymph glands fails to produce these effects. The melanotic neoplasms can be transplanted into a succession of hosts in which they produce the same abnormalities. The neoplastic cells resemble hemocytes; some cell lines are melanotic and others are unpigmented, but in both types, the tissue, when transplanted, grows rapidly in the hosts and kills them.
Summary (Interactive Fly)

janus family tyrosine kinase - regulates during segmentation - mutation creates an activated oncogene, causing hematopoietic neoplasms, overproliferation, and premature differentiation.

Gene Model and Products
Number of Transcripts
1
Number of Unique Polypeptides
1

Please see the JBrowse view of Dmel\hop for information on other features

To submit a correction to a gene model please use the Contact FlyBase form

Protein Domains (via Pfam)
Isoform displayed:
Pfam protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Protein Domains (via SMART)
Isoform displayed:
SMART protein domains
InterPro name
classification
start
end
Comments on Gene Model

Gene model reviewed during 5.52

Sequence Ontology: Class of Gene
Transcript Data
Annotated Transcripts
Name
FlyBase ID
RefSeq ID
Length (nt)
Assoc. CDS (aa)
FBtr0073457
5055
1177
Additional Transcript Data and Comments
Reported size (kB)

5.4, 5.1 (northern blot)

Comments
External Data
Crossreferences
Polypeptide Data
Annotated Polypeptides
Name
FlyBase ID
Predicted MW (kDa)
Length (aa)
Theoretical pI
RefSeq ID
GenBank
FBpp0073313
135.1
1177
7.25
Polypeptides with Identical Sequences

There is only one protein coding transcript and one polypeptide associated with this gene

Additional Polypeptide Data and Comments
Reported size (kDa)
Comments
External Data
Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)

Forms a complex with Hsp83 and piwi; probably Hop mediates the interaction between piwi and Hsp83.

(UniProt, Q24592)
Domain

Possesses two phosphotransferase domains. The second one probably contains the catalytic domain (By similarity), while the presence of slight differences suggest a different role for domain 1 (By similarity).

(UniProt, Q24592)
Linkouts
Sequences Consistent with the Gene Model
Mapped Features

Click to get a list of regulatory features (enhancers, TFBS, etc.) and gene disruptions (point mutations, indels, etc.) within or overlapping Dmel\hop using the Feature Mapper tool.

External Data
Crossreferences
Eukaryotic Promoter Database - A collection of databases of experimentally validated promoters for selected model organisms.
Linkouts
Expression Data
Expression Summary Ribbons
Colored tiles in ribbon indicate that expression data has been curated by FlyBase for that anatomical location. Colorless tiles indicate that there is no curated data for that location.
For complete stage-specific expression data, view the modENCODE Development RNA-Seq section under High-Throughput Expression below.
Transcript Expression
in situ
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
northern blot
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
RT-PCR
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Additional Descriptive Data
Marker for
 
Subcellular Localization
CV Term
Polypeptide Expression
mass spectroscopy
Stage
Tissue/Position (including subcellular localization)
Reference
Additional Descriptive Data
Marker for
 
Subcellular Localization
CV Term
Evidence
References
inferred from direct assay
located_in cytosol
inferred from direct assay
Expression Deduced from Reporters
High-Throughput Expression Data
Associated Tools

GBrowse - Visual display of RNA-Seq signals

View Dmel\hop in GBrowse 2
RNA-Seq by Region - Search RNA-Seq expression levels by exon or genomic region
Reference
See Gelbart and Emmert, 2013 for analysis details and data files for all genes.
Developmental Proteome: Life Cycle
Developmental Proteome: Embryogenesis
External Data and Images
Linkouts
EMBL-EBI Single Cell Expression Atlas
FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
Images
Alleles, Insertions, Transgenic Constructs, and Aberrations
Classical and Insertion Alleles ( 56 )
For All Classical and Insertion Alleles Show
 
Other relevant insertions
Transgenic Constructs ( 24 )
For All Alleles Carried on Transgenic Constructs Show
Transgenic constructs containing/affecting coding region of hop
Transgenic constructs containing regulatory region of hop
Aberrations (Deficiencies and Duplications) ( 47 )
Inferred from experimentation ( 47 )
Gene not disrupted in
Inferred from location ( 0 )
Alleles Representing Disease-Implicated Variants
Phenotypes
For more details about a specific phenotype click on the relevant allele symbol.
Lethality
Allele
Sterility
Allele
Other Phenotypes
Allele
Phenotype manifest in
Allele
hindgut & nucleus
hindgut & nucleus, with Scer\GAL4hs.PB
Orthologs
Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v8.0)
Homo sapiens (Human) (23)
Species\Gene Symbol
Score
Best Score
Best Reverse Score
Alignment
Complementation?
Transgene?
11 of 15
Yes
Yes
11 of 15
Yes
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
3  
1 of 15
No
No
1  
1 of 15
No
No
1  
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
3  
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1  
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
Model Organism Orthologs (via DIOPT v8.0)
Mus musculus (laboratory mouse) (22)
Species\Gene Symbol
Score
Best Score
Best Reverse Score
Alignment
Complementation?
Transgene?
13 of 15
Yes
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat) (21)
8 of 13
Yes
Yes
8 of 13
Yes
Yes
8 of 13
Yes
Yes
7 of 13
No
Yes
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
1 of 13
No
No
Xenopus tropicalis (Western clawed frog) (13)
11 of 12
Yes
Yes
7 of 12
No
Yes
7 of 12
No
Yes
6 of 12
No
Yes
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
1 of 12
No
No
Danio rerio (Zebrafish) (21)
13 of 15
Yes
Yes
11 of 15
No
Yes
10 of 15
No
Yes
7 of 15
No
Yes
6 of 15
No
Yes
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
1 of 15
No
No
Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode, roundworm) (3)
1 of 15
Yes
No
1 of 15
Yes
No
1 of 15
Yes
No
Arabidopsis thaliana (thale-cress) (1)
1 of 9
Yes
Yes
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) (1)
1 of 15
Yes
No
Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Fission yeast) (1)
1 of 12
Yes
No
Ortholog(s) in Drosophila Species (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG0919011T )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
AAA Syntenic Ortholog
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Drosophila suzukii
Spotted wing Drosophila
Drosophila simulans
Drosophila sechellia
Drosophila erecta
Drosophila yakuba
Drosophila ananassae
Drosophila pseudoobscura pseudoobscura
Drosophila persimilis
Drosophila willistoni
Drosophila willistoni
Drosophila virilis
Drosophila mojavensis
Drosophila grimshawi
Orthologs in non-Drosophila Dipterans (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG0915015J )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Musca domestica
House fly
Glossina morsitans
Tsetse fly
Lucilia cuprina
Australian sheep blowfly
Mayetiola destructor
Hessian fly
Aedes aegypti
Yellow fever mosquito
Anopheles darlingi
American malaria mosquito
Anopheles darlingi
American malaria mosquito
Anopheles gambiae
Malaria mosquito
Culex quinquefasciatus
Southern house mosquito
Orthologs in non-Dipteran Insects (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090W011A )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Bombyx mori
Silkmoth
Danaus plexippus
Monarch butterfly
Heliconius melpomene
Postman butterfly
Apis florea
Little honeybee
Apis mellifera
Western honey bee
Bombus impatiens
Common eastern bumble bee
Bombus terrestris
Buff-tailed bumblebee
Linepithema humile
Argentine ant
Megachile rotundata
Alfalfa leafcutting bee
Nasonia vitripennis
Parasitic wasp
Dendroctonus ponderosae
Mountain pine beetle
Dendroctonus ponderosae
Mountain pine beetle
Tribolium castaneum
Red flour beetle
Pediculus humanus
Human body louse
Rhodnius prolixus
Kissing bug
Cimex lectularius
Bed bug
Acyrthosiphon pisum
Pea aphid
Zootermopsis nevadensis
Nevada dampwood termite
Orthologs in non-Insect Arthropods (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG090X00ZI )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Strigamia maritima
European centipede
Ixodes scapularis
Black-legged tick
Stegodyphus mimosarum
African social velvet spider
Stegodyphus mimosarum
African social velvet spider
Tetranychus urticae
Two-spotted spider mite
Daphnia pulex
Water flea
Orthologs in non-Arthropod Metazoa (via OrthoDB v9.1) ( EOG091G01IS )
Organism
Common Name
Gene
Multiple Dmel Genes in this Orthologous Group
Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Purple sea urchin
Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Purple sea urchin
Ciona intestinalis
Vase tunicate
Ciona intestinalis
Vase tunicate
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Gallus gallus
Domestic chicken
Paralogs
Paralogs (via DIOPT v8.0)
Drosophila melanogaster (Fruit fly) (5)
1 of 10
1 of 10
1 of 10
1 of 10
1 of 10
Human Disease Associations
FlyBase Human Disease Model Reports
Disease Model Summary Ribbon
Disease Ontology (DO) Annotations
Models Based on Experimental Evidence ( 5 )
Potential Models Based on Orthology ( 8 )
Modifiers Based on Experimental Evidence ( 5 )
Allele
Disease
Interaction
References
Disease Associations of Human Orthologs (via DIOPT v8.0 and OMIM)
Note that ortholog calls supported by only 1 or 2 algorithms (DIOPT score < 3) are not shown.
Functional Complementation Data
Functional complementation data is computed by FlyBase using a combination of the orthology data obtained from DIOPT and OrthoDB and the allele-level genetic interaction data curated from the literature.
Interactions
Summary of Physical Interactions
Summary of Genetic Interactions
esyN Network Diagram
esyN Network Key:
Suppression
Enhancement

Please look at the allele data for full details of the genetic interactions
Starting gene(s)
Interaction type
Interacting gene(s)
Reference
Starting gene(s)
Interaction type
Interacting gene(s)
Reference
suppressible
External Data
Subunit Structure (UniProtKB)
Forms a complex with Hsp83 and piwi; probably Hop mediates the interaction between piwi and Hsp83.
(UniProt, Q24592 )
Linkouts
BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
MIST (genetic) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
MIST (protein-protein) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
Pathways
Signaling Pathways (FlyBase)
JAK-STAT Signaling Pathway Core Components -
The JAK-STAT signaling pathway is initiated by the binding of an extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor leading to receptor dimerization and the intracellular activation of a Janus kinase (JAK) family member. JAK phosphorylates cytoplasmic STAT family members which dimerize, translocate into the nucleus and regulate target gene expression. In Drosophila, the core pathway is limited to three ligands (the Unpaired family of cytokines), a single receptor (dome), JAK kinase (hop) and STAT (Stat92E). (Adapted from FBrf0225259).
Metabolic Pathways
External Data
Genomic Location and Detailed Mapping Data
Chromosome (arm)
X
Recombination map
1-34
Cytogenetic map
Sequence location
X:11,360,930..11,368,098 [-]
FlyBase Computed Cytological Location
Cytogenetic map
Evidence for location
10B5-10B6
Limits computationally determined from genome sequence between P{EP}CG11756EP1610 and P{EP}CG32666EP1452
Experimentally Determined Cytological Location
Cytogenetic map
Notes
References
10B6-10B6
(determined by in situ hybridisation)
Experimentally Determined Recombination Data
Notes
Stocks and Reagents
Stocks (19)
Genomic Clones (19)
cDNA Clones (26)
 

Please Note This section lists cDNAs and ESTs that fall within the genomic extent of the gene model, which may include cDNAs and ESTs of genes within introns, or of overlapping genes. Please see GBrowse for alignment of the cDNAs and ESTs to the gene model.

cDNA clones, fully sequenced
BDGP DGC clones
Other clones
Drosophila Genomics Resource Center cDNA clones

For each fully sequenced cDNA the DGRC maintains various forms of the cDNA (e.g tagged or untagged) in several different host vectors for subsequent cloning and expression in Drosophila and Drosophila cell lines.

cDNA Clones, End Sequenced (ESTs)
BDGP DGC clones
RNAi and Array Information
Linkouts
DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
Antibody Information
Laboratory Generated Antibodies
 
Commercially Available Antibodies
 
Other Information
Relationship to Other Genes
Source for database identify of

Source for identity of: hop CG1594

Source for database merge of
Additional comments

Identified by PCR fragment; relationship to other protein tyrosine kinase genes not known.

Other Comments

hop is required for os-induced Stat92E phosphorylation.

Treatment of S2-derived S2-NP cells with dsRNA made from templates generated with primers directed against hop results in a 12-24-fold decrease in JAK/STAT activity.

When dsRNA constructs are made and transiently transfected into S2 cells in RNAi experiments, an increase in the proportion of G1 phase cells is seen.

dsRNA made from templates generated with primers directed against this gene tested in RNAi screen for effects on Kc167 and S2R+ cell morphology.

Stat92E is part of an intracellular Jak-Stat signalling pathway and is activated by the hop Jak kinase. Partial loss of hop gene product activity gives a phenotype similar to that of Stat92E mutants, supporting the idea that the Jak-Stat pathway is involved in regulation of oogenesis.

phl acts downstream of hop during differentiation of lamellocytes in larvae.

hop is required for the renewal of male germline stem cells and for maintenance of the somatic cyst progenitor cell population in the testis.

hop is required for cell proliferation/survival in the eye imaginal disc, for the differentiation of photoreceptor cells, and for the establishment of the equator and of ommatidial polarity.

Candidate gene for testicular atrophy quantitative trait locus.

Dominant hop mutations cause hop to be a hyperactive kinase that can cause hyperactivation of the hop Stat92E pathway.

Phylogenetic analysis of the PTK family.

The hop kinase acts upstream of Stat92E in the JAK/STAT pathway. hop may activate Stat92E to regulate transcription of target genes such as eve. Stat92E is epistatic to hop.

A mutation in Stat92E has been identified by suppression of a hop mutant phenotype.

An allele of Stat92E was identified in a screen for second site suppressors of hopTum.

Mutations in Jak kinase, hop, can cause leukaemia-like abnormalities.

hop is an example of a maternally provided nonreceptor tyrosine kinase involved in segmentation of embryos. hop has a zygotic role in cellular proliferation.

Mutants display neoplastic phenotype.

hop is required for cell division and proper embryonic segmentation.

Identification: Identified by PCR fragment; relationship to other protein tyrosine kinase genes not known.

Most of the mutants are homozygous late zygotic (L-P) lethals; one mutant is a larval lethal; two other mutants have some adult survivors (hemizygous males being morphologically normal, but 40% of the homozygous females and 85% of the hemizygous females showing major defects). Heteroallelic females are lethal with the exceptions noted under the alleles. There is a maternal effect on thoracic and abdominal segments, the most extreme embryos <up>produced from homozygous "l(1)hop" germ-line clones that have not received a paternal copy of hop+</up> showing defects in the posterior spiracles and in segments T2 (denticle belt deleted). T3, A4 and A5 (segment missing) and A8 (segment reduced in size); the least extreme mutant embryos from germ-line clones show defects in segment A5. Defects visible in early segmentation stages. The extent of the defects is dependent on the strength of the maternal alleles and the paternal contribution. Wild-type sperm can rescue all defects, except those in A5. A few of the rescued progeny hatch and develop into adults.

The wild-type allele of hop is required for the continued cell division of all diploid cells as well as the establishment of the normal array of segments.

hop is dosage compensated. All viable heteroallelic combinations are female sterile, failing to produce eggs or laying abnormal eggs that are small, with a clear chorion and with chorionic filaments absent or partially fused.

Origin and Etymology
Discoverer
Etymology
Identification
External Crossreferences and Linkouts ( 81 )
Sequence Crossreferences
NCBI Gene - Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes, and links to genome-, phenotype-, and locus-specific resources worldwide.
GenBank Protein - A collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB.
RefSeq - A comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of reference sequences including genomic, transcript, and protein.
UniProt/Swiss-Prot - Manually annotated and reviewed records of protein sequence and functional information
Other crossreferences
Drosophila Genomics Resource Center - Drosophila Genomics Resource Center (DGRC) cDNA clones
EMBL-EBI Single Cell Expression Atlas
Eukaryotic Promoter Database - A collection of databases of experimentally validated promoters for selected model organisms.
Fly-FISH - A database of Drosophila embryo and larvae mRNA localization patterns
Flygut - An atlas of the Drosophila adult midgut
Reactome - An open-source, open access, manually curated and peer-reviewed pathway database.
GenomeRNAi - A database for cell-based and in vivo RNAi phenotypes and reagents
KEGG Genes - Molecular building blocks of life in the genomic space.
MARRVEL_MODEL
modMine - A data warehouse for the modENCODE project
SignaLink - A signaling pathway resource with multi-layered regulatory networks.
Linkouts
BioGRID - A database of protein and genetic interactions.
DroID - A comprehensive database of gene and protein interactions.
DRSC - Results frm RNAi screens
FlyAtlas - Adult expression by tissue, using Affymetrix Dros2 array
FlyCyc Genes - Genes from a BioCyc PGDB for Dmel
FlyMine - An integrated database for Drosophila genomics
Interactive Fly - A cyberspace guide to Drosophila development and metazoan evolution
InterologFinder - Protein-protein interactions (PPI) from both known and predicted PPI data sets.
KEGG Pathways - Wiring diagrams of molecular interactions, reactions and relations.
MIST (genetic) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
MIST (protein-protein) - An integrated Molecular Interaction Database
Synonyms and Secondary IDs (32)
Reported As
Symbol Synonym
HD-160
JAK
(Peercy and Starz-Gaiano, 2020, Lin et al., 2019, Terriente-Félix et al., 2017, Yadav et al., 2016, Thomas et al., 2015, Vlisidou and Wood, 2015, Xu and Cherry, 2014, Ferrandon, 2013, Gonzalez, 2013, Tsurumi et al., 2011, Yan et al., 2011, Gutierrez-Aviño et al., 2009, Ayala and Bach, 2008, Bakal et al., 2008, Baudot et al., 2008, Copf and Preat, 2008, Han and Harrison, 2008, Issigonis et al., 2008, McConnell et al., 2008, Sexton and Harrison, 2008, Shi et al., 2008, Wawersik et al., 2008, Wrobel et al., 2008, Yasugi et al., 2008, Assa-Kunik et al., 2007, Ayala et al., 2007, Eleftherianos et al., 2007, Kimble and Page, 2007, Kronhamn et al., 2007, Krzemien et al., 2007, Sotillos and Castelli-Gair, 2007, Castelli-Gair Hombria, 2006, DEVERGNE and NOSELLI, 2006, Guo and Harrison, 2006, Nystul and Spradling, 2006, Sexton et al., 2006, Sheng et al., 2006, Brown et al., 2005, Ip, 2005, Sheng et al., 2005, Meister, 2004, Ohlstein et al., 2004, Starz-Gaiano and Montell, 2004, Terry et al., 2004, Feix et al., 2003, Lopez-Schier, 2003, Mukherjee and Zeidler, 2003, Seyedoleslami Esfahani et al., 2003, Solnica-Krezel and Eaton, 2003, Xi et al., 2003, Castelli-Gair Hombria and Brown, 2002, Harrison et al., 2002, Harrison et al., 2002, Kisseleva et al., 2002, Lavine and Strand, 2002, Rawlings and Harrison, 2002, Silver and Montell, 2002, Mushegian and Medzhitov, 2001, Wasserman and DiNardo, 2001, Lagueux et al., 2000, Morrison et al., 2000, Morrison et al., 2000, Zeidler and Perrimon, 2000, Blair, 1999, Perrimon and Stern, 1999, Zeidler et al., 1999, Mathey-Prevot et al., 1998, Zeidler and Perrimon, 1998)
hop
(Lebo et al., 2021, Maurya et al., 2021, Yu et al., 2021, Cho et al., 2020, Dorogova et al., 2020, Fast et al., 2020, Graves et al., 2020, Huang et al., 2020, Jin et al., 2020, Kierdorf et al., 2020, Melamed and Kalderon, 2020, Port et al., 2020, Saint-Leandre et al., 2020, Syal et al., 2020, Vizcaya-Molina et al., 2020, Wan et al., 2020, Washington et al., 2020, Ahlers et al., 2019, Arbouzova et al., 2019, Asri et al., 2019, Bailetti et al., 2019, Banerjee et al., 2019, Herrera and Bach, 2019, Hudry et al., 2019, Panettieri et al., 2019, Powers and Srivastava, 2019, Sanchez Bosch et al., 2019, Snigdha et al., 2019, Tudrej et al., 2019, Varga et al., 2019, Wittes and Schüpbach, 2019, Xu et al., 2019, Yang et al., 2019, Yang et al., 2019, Ahmed-de-Prado et al., 2018, Bazzi et al., 2018, Borensztejn et al., 2018, Boulet et al., 2018, Green et al., 2018, Hao et al., 2018, Poirier et al., 2018, Tokusumi et al., 2018, Lee et al., 2017, Misra et al., 2017, Recasens-Alvarez et al., 2017, Sousa-Victor et al., 2017, Transgenic RNAi Project members, 2017-, Tsurumi et al., 2017, Bielmeier et al., 2016, Fregoso Lomas et al., 2016, Lamiable et al., 2016, Padash Barmchi et al., 2016, Saadin and Starz-Gaiano, 2016, Sarov et al., 2016, Zhimulev et al., 2016, Ayyaz et al., 2015, Glassford et al., 2015, Katsuyama et al., 2015, Liu et al., 2015, Perkins et al., 2015, Ren et al., 2015, Seeds et al., 2015, Shapiro-Kulnane et al., 2015, Thomas et al., 2015, Tsai et al., 2015, Vlachos et al., 2015, Yamamoto-Hino et al., 2015, Zhai et al., 2015, Bausek and Zeidler, 2014, Doherty et al., 2014, Haelterman et al., 2014, Haelterman et al., 2014.3.25, Kim and Choe, 2014, Sopko et al., 2014, Tipping and Perrimon, 2014, Xu et al., 2014, Gunawan et al., 2013, Guo et al., 2013, Kemp et al., 2013, Kingsolver et al., 2013, Morin-Poulard et al., 2013, Radyuk et al., 2013, Shen et al., 2013, Wang et al., 2013, Wells et al., 2013, Yamamoto et al., 2013-, Zeidler and Bausek, 2013, Zoranovic et al., 2013, Amoyel and Bach, 2012, Awofala et al., 2012, Feng et al., 2012, Garcia et al., 2012, Luo and Sehgal, 2012, Zoller and Schulz, 2012, Copf et al., 2011, Jiang et al., 2011, Kugler et al., 2011, Novakova and Dolezal, 2011, Stec and Zeidler, 2011, Tsurumi et al., 2011, Walker et al., 2011, Wang et al., 2011, Wright et al., 2011, Yan et al., 2011, Yoon et al., 2011, Beebe et al., 2010, Bina et al., 2010, Colodner and Feany, 2010, Ekas et al., 2010, Kallio et al., 2010, Lam et al., 2010, Lin et al., 2010, Liu et al., 2010, Makki et al., 2010, Popodi et al., 2010-, Reddy et al., 2010, Sinenko et al., 2010, Sotillos et al., 2010, Stofanko et al., 2010, Venken et al., 2010, Vidal et al., 2010, Almudi et al., 2009, Bertet et al., 2009, Buchon et al., 2009, Buchon et al., 2009, Classen et al., 2009, Flaherty et al., 2009, Gao et al., 2009, Gutierrez-Aviño et al., 2009, Habayeb et al., 2009, Hill-Burns and Clark, 2009, Jacques et al., 2009, Jiang et al., 2009, Kwon et al., 2009, Obbard et al., 2009, Tokusumi et al., 2009, Tokusumi et al., 2009, Copf and Preat, 2008, Han and Harrison, 2008, Kleino et al., 2008, Kwon et al., 2008, Leatherman and DiNardo, 2008, López-Onieva et al., 2008, Ni et al., 2008, Pastor-Pareja et al., 2008, Shi et al., 2008, Sotillos et al., 2008, Starz-Gaiano et al., 2008, Stofanko et al., 2008, Yasugi et al., 2008, Assa-Kunik et al., 2007, Avila and Erickson, 2007, Ayala-Camargo et al., 2007, Bach et al., 2007, Baeg et al., 2007, Beltran et al., 2007, Colinet et al., 2007, Guo and Harrison, 2007, Jang and Montell, 2007, Krzemień et al., 2007, Schlenke et al., 2007, Shen and Tanda, 2007, Sorrentino et al., 2007, Tsai et al., 2007, Xing et al., 2007, Yasugi et al., 2007, Zeitlinger et al., 2007, Brun et al., 2006, Ekas et al., 2006, Minakhina and Steward, 2006, Oishi et al., 2006, Rehwinkel et al., 2006, Shi et al., 2006, Hombria et al., 2005, Mukherjee et al., 2005, Rehwinkel et al., 2005, Wawersik et al., 2005, Wertheim et al., 2005, Xie et al., 2005, Yamashita et al., 2005, Rawlings et al., 2004, Sinenko and Mathey-Prevot, 2004, Tsai and Sun, 2004, Munier et al., 2002)
l(1)G18
msvl
Name Synonyms
JAK kinase
Janus-family kinase
Tumorous
Secondary FlyBase IDs
  • FBgn0001211
  • FBgn0003895
  • FBgn0022799
Datasets (0)
Study focus (0)
Experimental Role
Project
Project Type
Title
References (624)