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Lecuit, T. (2004). Junctions and vesicular trafficking during Drosophila cellularization.  J. Cell Sci. 117(16): 3427--3433.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0179302
Publication Type
Review
Abstract

The cellularization that converts the syncytial Drosophila embryo into thousands of distinct cells is a hybrid form of cleavage. It derives from cytokinesis and has acquired specific features required for epithelial biogenesis. Cellularization generates an epithelial layer in which adjacent cells are connected by apical adherens junctions. If this process goes awry, subsequent development is dramatically affected, in particular tissue remodelling during gastrulation. Cellularization is associated with the invagination of the plasma membrane between adjacent nuclei at the cell cortex, the formation of a basal-lateral surface and the assembly of apical adherens junctions. The regulated mobilization of intracellular pools of vesicles at defined sites of the plasma membrane underlies membrane growth and surface polarization. Genetic approaches have identified conserved core cellular pathways required for these processes, such as vesicular trafficking along the biosynthetic and endocytic routes, and vesicular insertion into the plasma membrane. The novel proteins Nullo and Slam, which are specifically induced during cellularization, represent developmental regulators of membrane growth during cellularization.

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    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    J. Cell Sci.
    Title
    Journal of Cell Science
    Publication Year
    1966-
    ISBN/ISSN
    0021-9533
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