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Citation
Zhou, C., Rao, Y., Rao, Y. (2008). A subset of octopaminergic neurons are important for Drosophila aggression.  Nat. Neurosci. 11(9): 1059--1067.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0210476
Publication Type
Research paper
Abstract

Aggression is an innate behavior that is important for animal survival and evolution. We examined the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying aggression in Drosophila. Reduction of the neurotransmitter octopamine, the insect equivalent of norepinephrine, decreased aggression in both males and females. Mutants lacking octopamine did not initiate fighting and did not fight other flies, although they still provoked other flies to fight themselves. Mutant males lost to the wild-type males in fighting and in competing for copulation with females. Enhanced octopaminergic signaling increased aggression in socially grouped flies, but not in socially isolated flies. We carried out genetic rescue experiments that revealed the functional importance of neuronal octopamine and identified a small subset of octopaminergic neurons in the suboesophageal ganglion as being important for aggression.

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Secondary IDs
  • FBrf0206759
Language of Publication
English
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Publication Type
Journal
Abbreviation
Nat. Neurosci.
Title
Nature Neuroscience
Publication Year
1998-
ISBN/ISSN
1097-6256
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