Open Close
Reference
Citation
Schlichting, M., Díaz, M.M., Xin, J., Rosbash, M. (2019). Neuron-specific knockouts indicate the importance of network communication to Drosophila rhythmicity.  eLife 8(): e48301.
FlyBase ID
FBrf0243752
Publication Type
Research paper
Abstract

Animal circadian rhythms persist in constant darkness and are driven by intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops. Although these cellular oscillators communicate, isolated mammalian cellular clocks continue to tick away in darkness without intercellular communication. To investigate these issues in Drosophila, we assayed behavior as well as molecular rhythms within individual brain clock neurons while blocking communication within the ca. 150 neuron clock network. We also generated CRISPR-mediated neuron-specific circadian clock knockouts. The results point to two key clock neuron groups: loss of the clock within both regions but neither one alone has a strong behavioral phenotype in darkness; communication between these regions also contributes to circadian period determination. Under these dark conditions, the clock within one region persists without network communication. The clock within the famous PDF-expressing s-LNv neurons however was strongly dependent on network communication, likely because clock gene expression within these vulnerable sLNvs depends on neuronal firing or light.

PubMed ID
PubMed Central ID
PMC6794074 (PMC) (EuropePMC)
Associated Information
Comments
Associated Files
Other Information
Secondary IDs
    Language of Publication
    English
    Additional Languages of Abstract
    Parent Publication
    Publication Type
    Journal
    Abbreviation
    eLife
    Title
    eLife
    ISBN/ISSN
    2050-084X
    Data From Reference